Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak   2 comments


Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak

The Committee of the Temple Officials of this famous Taoist Temple of the Chinese Dato’ Kong Diety located in Parit Buntar, State of Perak is re-building the old Temple with a new concrete one. These are new ceramic Dragons imported from China, to be used as the roof ornaments of the new Temple.

SP Lim

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

taiping-wedding-341

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

taiping-wedding-318

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

Building a new Taoist Temple in Parit Buntar, Perak.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge   2 comments


The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge (Malay: Jambatan Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah or Jambatan Kedua Pulau Pinang, Tamil : சுல்தான் அப்துல் ஹாலிம் முவாட்சாம் ஷா பாலம் or பினாங்கு இரண்டாவது பாலம்) E28 is a dual carriageway toll bridge in Penang, Malaysia. It connects Bandar Cassia (Batu Kawan) in Seberang Perai on mainland Peninsular Malaysia with Batu Maung on Penang Island. It is the second bridge to link the island to the mainland after the first Penang Bridge. The total length of the bridge is 24 km (15 mi) with length over water at 16.9 km (10.5 mi), making it the longest bridge in Malaysia and the longest in Southeast Asia. China Harbour Engineering Co Ltd (CHEC), a main contractor for the second bridge was expected to start work on the second Penang bridge in November 2007 and complete the project in 2011, but the completion date was then postponed to May 2012, and later to February 2014. Construction started in November 2008. To reduce the cost of construction, its design was then modified to resemble the first cable stayed Penang Bridge. The bridge has been built with a large loan from the People’s Republic of China to continue and maintain the economic relationship between China and Malaysia. The bridge was officially opened on 1 March 2014 at 20:30 MST and was named after the fourteen Yang di-Pertuan Agong, Tuanku Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah of Kedah and was assigned with the route number E28.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Route

Maintained by Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd (JKSB)
Length: 24 km (15 mi)
Existed: 2006 – present
History: Construction works started November 2008 to be completed in May 2012, but was later delayed to February 2014.[1]
Opening ceremony on 1 March 2014 at 20:30MST.
Opened to traffic on 2 March 2014 at 00:01MST
The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

Bridge specifications

  • Overall length: 24 km (15 mi)
  • Length over water: 16.9 km (10.5 mi)
  • Main span: Length – 250 m
  • Height clearance (above water): 30 m
  • Number of vehicle lanes: 2 + 1 for motorcycles (each direction)
  • Targeted date to be opened to the public: 2 March 2014
  • Overall cost: RM 4.5 Billion
  • Average time taken to drive from Batu Kawan to Batu Maung: 20 mins
  • Proposed speed limit on bridge: 80 km/h (50 mph)
  • Percentage of local contents to be used: 60%
The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

The Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah Bridge or Penang Second Bridge.

Designer Primary
Government of Malaysia
Malaysian Highway Authority(LLM)Secondary
Package 1
China China Harbour Engineering Co Ltd (CHEC)
Package 2
UEM Builders Berhad
Constructed by Primary

Package 1
China China Harbour Engineering Co Ltd (CHEC)

Package 2
UEM Builders Berhad

Package 3A
MAZELE

Package 3B
IJM Construction Sdn Bhd

Package 3C
HRA Teguh Sdn Bhd

Package 3D
SU Citra Bina Sdn Bhd

Secondary
Minconsult Sdn Bhd (C&S Consultant) (Consultanting Engineer)

Inaugurated 1 March 2014 at 20:30 MST
Opened 2 March 2014 at 00:01 MST

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennessee Williams ~ Part 2   2 comments


THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennessee Williams ~ Part 2

Apologies as I was having electrical power failure for the whole day (Thursday, 22/09/2016) until 7.15 pm with partial restoration of one phase only!

SP Lim

From Wikipedia:-

Thomas LanierTennesseeWilliams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983) was an American playwright and author of many stage classics. Along withEugene O’Neill and Arthur Miller he is considered among the three foremost playwrights in 20th-century American drama.

After years of obscurity, he became suddenly famous with The Glass Menagerie(1944), closely reflecting his own unhappy family background. This heralded a string of successes, including A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955), and Sweet Bird of Youth (1959). His later work attempted a new style that did not appeal to audiences, and alcohol and drug dependence further inhibited his creative output. His drama A Streetcar Named Desire is often numbered on the short list of the finest American plays of the 20th century alongside Long Day’s Journey into Night and Death of a Salesman.

Much of Williams’ most acclaimed work was adapted for the cinema. He also wrote short stories, poetry, essays and a volume of memoirs. In 1979, four years before his death, Williams was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame.

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennessee Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennessee Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennessee Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennessee Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennessee Williams ~ Part 2

Major plays

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennesse Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園 by Tennessee Williams ~ Part 2

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園   Leave a comment


THE GLASS MENAGERIE
玻璃動物園

“I tried to leave you behind me, but I am more faithful than I intended to be.”
“我試圖離開你,但我比自己想像中更愛你

22 – 24 Sep 2016 (Thu – Sat)
stage 1, Performing Arts Centre of Penang (penangpac)
檳城表演藝術中心 壹號劇場

Drama | 戲劇
* In English | 英語演出

*****************************************************************************************************************************************

A mother who refuses to let go of her past. A sister who shelters herself in fantasy. A brother suffocating under the weight of his obligations to them both.

Welcome to the Wingfield home, a world of it’s own in which the line between truth and illusion becomes blurred. Fear and desperation bring a gentleman caller for dinner, thereby igniting the flames of change. In glass houses such as these, something is bound to break. 70 years after its creation, the pure poetry of Tennessee Williams’ classic masterpiece The Glass Menagerie still grips the hearts and minds of anyone willing to receive it. The universal themes of family, love, loss and hope for the future are truly timeless.

Starring Marina Tan (Marble Hearts, Don’t Let Shakespeare Know, Shear Madness, Postcards from Rosa), Christopher Preslar, Tan Seoh Chen, and Ivan Gabriel.

一位過度沉溺於過去的母親,一位總是把自己鎖在幻想中的女兒,一位被家庭現況壓得透不過氣來的兒子… …

歡迎來到溫菲爾德的家庭!這是一個孤立在現實與理想之外,美麗卻易碎的玻璃動物園。出自於二十世紀美國重要劇作家 田納西・威廉斯的經典之作,《玻璃動物園》至今仍在人類雋永不變的親情、愛情、期望與失落的輪迴中綻放迷幻光彩。

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

SHOW INFO | 演出資訊

DATE | 日期 :
22 – 24 Sep 2016 (Thu – Sat)

TIME | 時間 :
8:30pm

VENUE | 地點 :
stage 1, penangpac
檳城表演藝術中心 壹號劇場

TICKET PRICE | 票價 :
RM 45 for Adults
RM 35 for Students, Physically-challenged, TAS Card Holders & Senior Citizens above 60

PROMOTION | 優惠 :
Buy 5 Free 1 (for walk-in or phone purchase only)
School Group Booking RM 40 (Buy 1 Free 1), contact penangpac

ENQUIRY | 詢問:
Please contact | 請聯繫
penangpac +604-899 1722 / 2722 (10am – 6:30pm daily)

 

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE
玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE
玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE
玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE
玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE
玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE
玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE
玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 玻璃動物園

THE GLASS MENAGERIE
玻璃動物園

Taiping Lake Gardens   3 comments


Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens is the first public garden established during the British rule in Malaysia. The garden is located near Bukit Larut, and is equidistant to the town centre and the Taiping Zoo.

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

History

The Taiping Lake Gardens was originally a mining ground before it was established as a public garden in 1880. The idea of a public garden was the brainchild of Colonel Robert Sandilands Frowd Walker. The garden was developed by Charles Compton Reade (1880–1933), who was also responsible for planning the Kuala Lumpur garden town, together with Lady Swettenham.

The abandoned tin mine ground was donated by Chung Thye Phin as a recreation park for public use. In 1884 the gardens were planted with grasses, flowers and trees; a part of the gardens was fenced, to keep bulls out.

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

The 64 hectares (160 acres) site was the first public garden in Malaya, and was cherished for its beauty; it has been well-maintained since its opening. There are ten scenic lakes and ponds, which highlight the gardens. Along Residency Road, near the gardens, were golden rain trees (Malay: angsana) (pterocarpus indicus) planted along the pathway. In George L. Peet’s A Journal in the Federal Capital, when he visited Taiping in 1933 he said “I know of no more lovely sight in this country than the Taiping gardens when the rays of the early morning sun are shining obliquely through their clumps of bamboo, palms and isolated trees scattered on islands among the expanse of water. One receives in that glorious half hour an experience of light in foliage that is quite unobtainable in England”.

There are few private and government houses located near the gardens; among them are the Old Residency (home of the Secretary to the Resident), the Raja’s House at the junction of Birch Road and Residency Road and the army officers’ residences on Batu Tugoh Road. The gardens were so striking that they attracted many travelers to write of their beauty:

 

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Attractions

  • Lakes and ponds – There are about 10 man-made lakes and ponds distributed throughout the gardens.
  • Maxwell Hill (Bukit Larut) – A hill station with an altitude of about 1000m; ideal for jungle-trekking and camping. Accessible by four-wheel drive; accommodation available on the hilltop. No reservations; visitors must go early (at 8 am) to buy tickets for the day. Visitors must specify what time they want to go up and what time to come down. Cost is RM4.00 (US$1.40) per person, round trip. One option is to hike up, which takes an average of 2-3/4 hours (one way); the jeep journey takes 25 minutes.
  • Tulip garden – Located at Bukit Larut, it is the first tulip farm established in Malaysia. Admission to the tulip farm is RM1 (US$0.35) outside tulip season and RM2 (US$0.70) during the season.
  • Taiping Zoo and Night Safari Taiping – First zoo to be established in Malaysia; popular on weekends with day-trippers from out of town
    • Day zoo: adults RM12, child (3–12 years) RM8 (US$2.80); discounts available for school groups, senior citizens (age 55+) and tourist groups (20 or more); open 08:30-18:00, feeding times 10 am and noon
    • Night safari: adults RM20, child (3–12 years) RM10 (US$3.50); discounts available for senior citizens (60+) and tourist groups (20+); open 20:00-23:00 (closes at midnight on Saturdays and the eve of public holidays)

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia.

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2   Leave a comment


Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

 

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1   2 comments


Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Sun.
Sun Wukong (孫悟空)
Sun Wukong and Jade Rabbit.jpg

Sun Wukong depicted in Japanese artist  Yoshitoshi‘s  One Hundred Aspects of the Moon, 1889.
First appearance Journey to the West
Sun Wukong
Sun Wukong (Chinese characters).svg

“Sun Wukong” in Traditional (top) and Simplified (bottom) Chinese characters
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese 孫悟空
Simplified Chinese 孙悟空
Vietnamese name
Vietnamese Tôn Ngộ Không
Thai name
Thai เห้งเจีย
RTGS Heng Chia[1]
Korean name
Hangul 손오공
Japanese name
Kanji 孫悟空
Hiragana そん ごくう
Malay name
Malay Sun Gokong
Indonesian name
Indonesian Sun Go Kong

Sun Wukong, also known as the Monkey King, is a mythological figure who features in a body of legends, which can be traced back to the period of the Song dynasty. He appears as a main character in the 16th century Chinese classical novel Journey to the West. Sun Wukong is also found in many later stories and adaptations. In the novel, he is a monkey born from a stone who acquires supernatural powers through Taoist practices. After rebelling against heaven and being imprisoned under a mountain by the Buddha, he later accompanies the monk Xuanzang on a journey to retrieve Buddhist sutras from India.

Sun Wukong possesses immense strength; he is able to lift his 13,500 jīn (7,960 kilograms (17,550 lb)) staff with ease. He is also extremely fast, able to travel 108,000 li (21,675 kilometres (13,468 mi)) in one somersault. (Note that this is more than half way around the world.) Sun knows 72 transformations, which allow him to transform into various animals and objects; however, he is troubled in transforming into other forms, due to the accompanying incomplete transformation of his tail. Sun Wukong is a skilled fighter, capable of holding his own against the best warriors of heaven. Each of his hairs possess magical properties, capable of being transformed into clones of the Monkey King himself, and/or into various weapons, animals, and other objects. He knows spells to command wind, part water, conjure protective circles against demons, and freeze humans, demons, and gods alike.

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

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