The Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival in Penang   Leave a comment


1-Evening of Lights 051The Mid-Autumn Festival is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese people. The festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese Han calendar and Vietnamese calendar (within 15 days of the autumnal equinox), on the night of the full moon between early September to early October of the Gregorian calendar.

Mainland China listed the festival as an “intangible cultural heritage” in 2006 and a public holiday in 2008.[1] It is also a public holiday in Taiwan. Among the Vietnamese, it is considered the second-most important holiday tradition after Tết.[citation needed]
The Mid-Autumn Festival is also known by other names, such as:
Moon Festival or Harvest Moon Festival, because of the celebration’s association with the full moon on this night, as well as the traditions of moon worship and moon gazing.
Mooncake Festival, because of the popular tradition of eating mooncakes on this occasion.
Zhōngqiū Jié (中秋節), the official name in Mandarin Chinese.
Lantern Festival, a term sometimes used in Singapore and Malaysia, which is not to be confused with the Lantern Festival in China that occurs on the 15th day of the first month of the Chinese calendar.
Reunion Festival, because in olden times, a woman in China would take the occasion to visit her parents before returning to celebrate with her husband and his parents.
Children’s Festival, in Vietnam, because of the emphasis on the celebration of children.


Dates
The Mid-Autumn Festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Han calendar—essentially the night of a full moon—which falls near the Autumnal Equinox (on a day between September 8 and October 7 in the Gregorian calendar). In 2014 the Mid-Autumn Festival fell on September 8. It will occur on these days in coming years:

2015: September 27
2016: September 15
2017: October 4
2018: September 24
2019: September 13
2020: October 1
2021: September 21

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia

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