Archive for March 17, 2016

Photo ~ Day Nine: Warmth & the Quality of Light ~ Worker at the Charcoal Kiln   11 comments


Photo 101
Day Nine: Warmth & the Quality of Light

Worker of the Charcoal Kiln

The caption alone suggests a hot and dusty place. The charcoal kilns are extremely warm but still bearable but it was equally dark.
The sunlight was coming from the side door and from the back portion of the kiln. Using flash will destroy the ambience and give unusual shadows that shall be unartistic. So I made do with higher ISO and tried to hold still a few seconds longer without the use of tripod. The charcoal worker was sieving for bigger pieces of the charcoal from the ashes. These small pieces of charcoal are very useful for grilling of satay and making cakes or biscuits.

SP Lim

PSP Outing KSepetang 3157

Photo 101
Day Nine: Warmth & the Quality of Light
Photography means “drawing with light,” and when you snap a picture with your camera, you use and record light to create an image.

When we’re out and about, we use the sun — our most abundant light source — to capture our scenes.

The Hagia Sophia is an impressive mosque in Istanbul, Turkey. If you ever find yourself wandering inside, here’s what you’ll see, when you look up:

Photo: not included

We can also use alternate and artificial sources, like candles and lamps, to create certain effects and manipulate an image’s overall mood (which we’ll talk more about tomorrow).

The numerous spotlights on the chandeliers — combined with lots of ambient and natural light filtering in from outside — create a warm, rich, and even scene of yellows and golds.

Today, capture an image of warmth, using the sun as your source. And if the sun is nowhere to be found, don’t worry! You can interpret warmth in a different way.

Today’s Tip: If you’d like to experiment more, consider the direction and quality of light. First, let’s talk about front light and side light.

Front light is great for outdoor landscapes and group portraits, and can certainly capture warmth. Side light is fun to experiment with, especially for portraiture, fine art, and architecture.

A front-lit subject faces the light source and is even-lit and flat, primarily without shadows. Front light is the most straightforward to work with, but isn’t as dramatic.

When you light a subject from the side, the mix of light and shadow shows more depth and reveals textures, patterns, and complexities (even flaws) in the shot. It can create unexpected results, and be more dramatic.

Cheers,
Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team

Yosakoi Parade 2016 ~ Part 3 ~ Final   Leave a comment


Yosakoi Parade 2016 ~ Part 3 ~ Final

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Yosakoi Parade 2016 ~ Part 3 ~ Final

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Yosakoi Parade 2016 ~ Part 3 ~ Final

I was photo-shooting in capacity as a volunteer photographer without payment or allowance at the 3rd. Yosakoi Parade and Carnival 2016 held at the Esplanade, George Town, Penang. Though I brought two Canon EOS DSLR’s, I only used my better camera Canon EOS 5D Mark III and kept my back-up camera Canon EOS 70D in my bag without once zipping the bag open. The pace was quite fast and there is no opportunity for a second take in many cases. Anyway, one photography well taken is worth ten other photographs that are out-of-focus and/or under-exposed due to the rapid falling darkness of the night.

Yosakoi 2016

Till the next Yosakoi Parade & Carnival next year ……

SP LIm

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