Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Details in ” The Traditional Artist at Work “   1 comment


Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Details in ” The Traditional Artist at Work “

I am not an expert on Macro Photography due to my poor patience – by the time a senior citizen focussed on an insect and ready to shoot it, it just flew away. Macro photography in nature is definitely not my cup of tea at all. I am submitting a photograph of a traditional artist painting more intricate details on the Taoist Door Guardians or Gods, in a local clan association heritage building. Detailed artwork is actually  done by his memory and past experience. Hope it passes the Photo Challenge on “Details” – the artistic ones.

SP Lim

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Details " The Traditional Artist at Work "

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Details ” The Traditional Artist at Work “

From Wikipedia:-

A door god (simplified Chinese: 门神; traditional Chinese: 門神; pinyin: ménshén) is a Chinese decoration placed on each side of an entry to a temple, home, business, etc., which is believed to keep evil spirits from entering. It is also seen in other East Asian countries such as Korea, Japan and Vietnam.

The custom of pasting pictures of door gods on doors dates back to ancient China. In theHan dynasty, people believed that peach wood has spiritual properties and can ward off evil spirits so they started making auspicious carvings on peach wood and hanging them around their homes. Following the invention of paper, paper gradually replaced peach wood as people started drawing and writing on paper instead. In earlier times, Shentu and Yulü were the most common choice for door gods. People drew portraits of them on paper and pasted them on doors. In the Tang dynasty, two generals – Qin Qiong and Yuchi Gong – became door gods when Emperor Taizong ordered portraits of them to be made and pasted on gates in the hope of attracting good luck and scaring away evil spirits. Other folklore heroes and mythological figures were subsequently added to the repertoire.

The door gods usually come in pairs, facing each other; it is considered bad luck to place the figures back-to-back. There are many different door gods, of which the most common ones are Qin Qiong and Yuchi Gong. Portraits of Wei Zheng or Zhong Kui are used on single doors.

 


Details

Discover the intimate details of something unexpected, and share your images with us.

If you’ve followed my previous photo challenges, you’ll know that I am enamored with nature. I love the exotic and the mundane, the wondrous and the earthy. One of my favorite things about nature is her details — the intricate vascular system of a leaf, the wispy patterns in clouds at sunset, or luminous beads of dew on the delicate filaments of a dandelion seed. When distilled down to the details, a weed becomes a lovely piece of art.

“If your photographs aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” — Robert Capa

A macro photograph of dewdrops on dandelion seeds. Photo by Jen Hooks.

A macro photograph of dewdrops on dandelion seeds. Photo by Jen Hooks.

Fun Fact: This image was shot with my phone and an inexpensive clip-on macro lens called an olloclip. You don’t need fancy equipment to capture tiny details!

For this week’s challenge, try to look past the big picture and take a more intimate approach. Zoom in on details in unexpected places — it can be something from the natural world, or it can be human-made. We’re excited to see what you find with your lens.

 

<a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/details/”>Details</a&gt;

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One response to “Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Details in ” The Traditional Artist at Work “

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  1. Pingback: Details (Offspring) | What's (in) the picture?

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