Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1   2 comments


Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Sun.
Sun Wukong (孫悟空)
Sun Wukong and Jade Rabbit.jpg

Sun Wukong depicted in Japanese artist  Yoshitoshi‘s  One Hundred Aspects of the Moon, 1889.
First appearance Journey to the West
Sun Wukong
Sun Wukong (Chinese characters).svg

“Sun Wukong” in Traditional (top) and Simplified (bottom) Chinese characters
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese 孫悟空
Simplified Chinese 孙悟空
Vietnamese name
Vietnamese Tôn Ngộ Không
Thai name
Thai เห้งเจีย
RTGS Heng Chia[1]
Korean name
Hangul 손오공
Japanese name
Kanji 孫悟空
Hiragana そん ごくう
Malay name
Malay Sun Gokong
Indonesian name
Indonesian Sun Go Kong

Sun Wukong, also known as the Monkey King, is a mythological figure who features in a body of legends, which can be traced back to the period of the Song dynasty. He appears as a main character in the 16th century Chinese classical novel Journey to the West. Sun Wukong is also found in many later stories and adaptations. In the novel, he is a monkey born from a stone who acquires supernatural powers through Taoist practices. After rebelling against heaven and being imprisoned under a mountain by the Buddha, he later accompanies the monk Xuanzang on a journey to retrieve Buddhist sutras from India.

Sun Wukong possesses immense strength; he is able to lift his 13,500 jīn (7,960 kilograms (17,550 lb)) staff with ease. He is also extremely fast, able to travel 108,000 li (21,675 kilometres (13,468 mi)) in one somersault. (Note that this is more than half way around the world.) Sun knows 72 transformations, which allow him to transform into various animals and objects; however, he is troubled in transforming into other forms, due to the accompanying incomplete transformation of his tail. Sun Wukong is a skilled fighter, capable of holding his own against the best warriors of heaven. Each of his hairs possess magical properties, capable of being transformed into clones of the Monkey King himself, and/or into various weapons, animals, and other objects. He knows spells to command wind, part water, conjure protective circles against demons, and freeze humans, demons, and gods alike.

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

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2 responses to “Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

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  1. I really liked that very first graphic with the Monkey King and the…rabbit?? Ah, magic hair, to shed a hair make a clone and send that clone out to wash the car…that would be sweet.

    Liked by 1 person

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