Archive for the ‘Antiquities’ Category

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3   Leave a comment


Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda, IPA: [pʰàʊɴ dɔ̀ ʔú pʰəjá]), also spelt Hpaung Daw Oo or Phaung Daw Oo) is a notable Buddhist site in Myanmar (formerly Burma), located on the Inle Lake in Shan State.

Surrounding the Pagoda, and in the basement are shops selling traditional Shan and Burmese merchandise.

Images

The pagoda houses five small gilded images of Buddha, which have been covered in gold leaf to the point that their original forms cannot be seen. The gold-leaf application to such excess is relatively recent. Old photographs hanging on the monastery walls show some of the images in a more pristine form. It is reported that some gold has been removed on occasion to reduce its mass. Although the monastery is open to all for veneration, only men are permitted to place gold leaf on the images. Another part of the ritual for pilgrims is to place a small robe or thingan around the images, and to take the robe back to their houses and place it on their own altar as a token of respect for the Buddha and his teachings.

 

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 3

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2   Leave a comment


Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda, IPA: [pʰàʊɴ dɔ̀ ʔú pʰəjá]), also spelt Hpaung Daw Oo or Phaung Daw Oo) is a notable Buddhist site in Myanmar (formerly Burma), located on the Inle Lake in Shan State.

Surrounding the Pagoda, and in the basement are shops selling traditional Shan and Burmese merchandise.

Images

The pagoda houses five small gilded images of Buddha, which have been covered in gold leaf to the point that their original forms cannot be seen. The gold-leaf application to such excess is relatively recent. Old photographs hanging on the monastery walls show some of the images in a more pristine form. It is reported that some gold has been removed on occasion to reduce its mass. Although the monastery is open to all for veneration, only men are permitted to place gold leaf on the images. Another part of the ritual for pilgrims is to place a small robe or thingan around the images, and to take the robe back to their houses and place it on their own altar as a token of respect for the Buddha and his teachings.

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia

 

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 2

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1   1 comment


Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar ~ Take 1

 

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda, IPA: [pʰàʊɴ dɔ̀ ʔú pʰəjá]), also spelt Hpaung Daw Oo or Phaung Daw Oo) is a notable Buddhist site in Myanmar (formerly Burma), located on the Inle Lake in Shan State.

Surrounding the Pagoda, and in the basement are shops selling traditional Shan and Burmese merchandise.

Images

The pagoda houses five small gilded images of Buddha, which have been covered in gold leaf to the point that their original forms cannot be seen. The gold-leaf application to such excess is relatively recent. Old photographs hanging on the monastery walls show some of the images in a more pristine form. It is reported that some gold has been removed on occasion to reduce its mass. Although the monastery is open to all for veneration, only men are permitted to place gold leaf on the images. Another part of the ritual for pilgrims is to place a small robe or thingan around the images, and to take the robe back to their houses and place it on their own altar as a token of respect for the Buddha and his teachings.

Extracted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Developing Your Eye, Day Eight: “Treasure”   2 comments


BLOGGING UNIVERSITY, PHOTOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENTS

 

bloggingu-blue-logo

 

Developing Your Eye, Day Eight: “Treasure”

This is my Day Eight’s submission on the theme of “Treasure” is my snap-shot entitled ” My Treasure Trove ” of antique Nyonyawares including a big Nyonya Antique Teapot from my Grandmother and Great Grandmother’s time.

SP Lim

Developing Your Eye, Day Eight : “Treasure”

Developing Your Eye, Day Eight : “Treasure”

From Wikipedia:-

Peranakan Chinese or Straits-born Chinese are the descendants of Chineseimmigrants who came to the Malay archipelago including British Malaya (nowPeninsular Malaysia and Singapore, where they are also referred to as Baba-Nyonya) and Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia; where they’re also referred as Kiau-Seng)  –  between the 15th and 17th centuries.

Members of this community in Malaysia address themselves as “Baba Nyonya”. Nyonya is the term for the women and Baba for the men. It applies especially to the Han populations of the British Straits Settlements of Malaya and the Dutch-controlled island of Java and other locations, who have adopted Nusantara customs — partially or in full — to be somewhat assimilated into the local communities. Many were the elites of Singapore, more loyal to the British than to China. Most have lived for generations along the Straits of Malacca. They were usually traders, the middleman of the British and the Chinese, or the Chinese and Malays, or vice versa because they were mostly English educated. Because of this, they almost always had the ability to speak two or more languages.

While the term Peranakan is most commonly used to refer to those of Chinese descent also known as Straits Chinese (named after the Straits Settlements; 土生華人 in Chinese; Tionghoa-Selat or Tionghoa Peranakan in Indonesian;Phuket Baba among Thais in Phuket, Thailand), there are also other, comparatively smaller Peranakan communities, such as Indian Hindu Peranakans (Chitty), Arab/Indian Muslim Peranakans (Jawi Pekan) (Jawi being the Javanised Arabic script, Pekan a colloquial contraction of Peranakan) and Eurasian Peranakans (Kristang) (Kristang = Christians of Portuguese and Asian ancestry). The group has parallels to the Cambodian Hokkien, who are descendants of Hoklo Chinese, and the Pashu of Myanmar, a Burmese word for the Peranakan or Straits Chinese who have settled in Myanmar.They maintained their culture partially despite their native language gradually disappearing a few generations after settlement.

Inserted by SP Lim

 

Developing Your Eye II, Day Eight: “Treasure” - the zoomed in version.

Developing Your Eye II, Day Eight: “Treasure” – the zoomed in version.


Developing Your Eye, Day Eight – “Treasure”

Day Eight: “Treasure” — Zoom In

Objects, places, people, moments — we all cherish something or someone. Anything deeply meaningful to you can be a treasure.

A treasure can be grand, like a precious heirloom, or teeny-tiny, like the first plump blackberry of spring atop a tart:

Developing Your Eye, Day Eight: “Treasure”

Developing Your Eye, Day Eight: “Treasure”

Or perhaps it’s the vintage coat passed down from your grandmother, your once-in-a-lifetime trip through the Himalayas, a quiet space in the woods, or your children. What’s your treasure?

Today’s Tip: Get close to your subject. Use the zoom function in your camera, or physically move closer to it. Often, our goal is to capture as much of a scene as we can. This time, zoom in on your subject or a particular detail to tell a more interesting story.

Visit the resource page for details. Remember to tag your post with#developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

Publish a new post

Cheers,
Cheri and the WordPress.com Team

Interesting display of antiques and collectibles   Leave a comment


While we were walking around the Heritage area of George Town, Penang, we encountered an interesting display of antiques and collectibles at a place one expected to see such a display. It was a great opportunity of photo-shooting at this location.

SP Lim

Detailed stone carvings of Khoo Kongsi of Penang   Leave a comment


Detailed wooden and stone carvings of Khoo Kongsi of Penang
In this series, I shall feature the stone carvings only which I had taken sometime back at Khoo Kongsi.

SP Lim

More from the Pinang Peranakan Mansion of Penang   Leave a comment


More from the Pinang Peranakan Mansion of Penang I was quite surprised by the article in the Wikipedia on Chung Keng Quee. This is quite a comprehensive and detailed article on the famous personality of Penang past.

From Wikipedia
Townhouse and temple on Church Street
Pinang Peranakan Mansion, or Hye Kee Chan
In Georgetown, Penang Chung, Keng Quee became known as the city’s great connoisseur of architecture.
In 1893, Chung, Keng Quee acquired two adjacent properties along Church Street on Penang Island. The first was the former headquarters of the Ghee Hin – the Hai San had ousted them in the 1870s. The second was a Chinese school, the Goh Hock Tong (or Ng Fook Tong in Cantonese) meaning Five Luck Villa. He offered the school an alternative site in Chulia Street, where a new building was completed on 1898.
Chung, Keng Quee converted the former Ghee Hin headquarters into his townhouse and office and named this, Hye Kee Chan (海记栈), or Sea Remembrance Store. It has interior fittings including Victorian cast iron columns from Walter Macfarlane & Co of Glasgow (also known as The Saracen Foundry).
Macfarlane was also responsible for the beautiful iron gates and fencing of the former Five Luck Villa building which was converted into a personal temple (Shen-chih hsueh-shu where Shen-chih was his fancy name and hsueh-shu means a traditional-style private family school).
In the temple stands a life-size bronze statue of Chung Keng Quee. The statue was commissioned by the Engineers’ Institute that he had generously donated a new building to. It was created by Benjamin Creswick and a facsimile of it was shown at the Royal Academy of Arts in 1903. On the base of the statue will be found the signature of Benjamin Creswick, and an imprint, Broad and Sons, the bronze founders in Birmingham who cast the statue.
Today, Hye Kee Chan is more commonly known as the Pinang Peranakan Mansion. Open to the public, it serves as a museum showcasing the lifestyle, customs and traditions of the Peranakans or Straits Chinese – an example of adaptive reuse.

Ancestral Hall of the Pinang Peranakan Mansion   Leave a comment


Ancestral Hall of the Pinang Peranakan Mansion

SP Lim

Gyeongbokgung Palace of South Korea   Leave a comment


From Wikipedia :-
Gyeongbokgung(경복궁), also known as Gyeongbokgung Palace or Gyeongbok Palace — is a royal palace located in northern Seoul, South Korea. First constructed in 1395, later burned and abandoned for almost three centuries, and then reconstructed in 1867, it was the main and largest palace of the Five Grand Palaces built by the Joseon Dynasty.[1] The name means “Palace” [Gung] “Greatly Blessed by Heaven” [Gyeongbok].

In the early 20th century, much of the palace was destroyed by the Empire of Japan. Since then, the walled palace complex has been gradually restored back to its original form. As of 2009, roughly 40% of the original number of palace buildings still stand or are reconstructed.

There is creative reading as well as creative writing. — Ralph Waldo Emerson

Penang Museum – a brief look   Leave a comment


Penang Museum – a brief look by the blogger in 15 minutes.

SP Lim

%d bloggers like this: