Archive for the ‘Hill Tribes’ Category

Day 4.7 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake   Leave a comment


Day 4.7 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.7 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.7 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.7 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.7 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.7 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.7 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.7 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake. The black umbrella brigade on the boat.

Day 4.7 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.7 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.7 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake. As each boat passed through the water way, this toll collector would collect the toll for the useage.

Day 4.7 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake. The old stupa and the new satellite dishes as time progresses.

Day 4.7 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake.
The old stupa and the new satellite dishes as time progresses.

 

Day 4.6 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake   Leave a comment


Day 4.6 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.6 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake   2 comments


Day 4.3 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.3 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake   Leave a comment


Day 4.2 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 - Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

Day 4.2 – Our Burma Tour ~ Water Tour of Inle Lake

At the betel nut kiosk of Myanmar   Leave a comment


At the betel nut kiosk of Myanmar

At the betel nut kiosk of Myanmar, Our island is named after this nut - Areca nut used like tobacco.

At the betel nut kiosk of Myanmar, Our island is named after this nut – Areca nut used like tobacco.

Little dolls of the Hill Tribes of Myanmar   Leave a comment


Little dolls of the Hill Tribes of Myanmar or Burma

Little dolls of the Hill Tribes of Myanmar or Burma

Little dolls of the Hill Tribes of Myanmar or Burma

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp   Leave a comment


Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Getting better after seeking acupuncture’s treatment with Chinese Herbal medicine. Pain is more tolerable than before.

Thank you for the continuous support of my blog. I appreciate it very much in view of my health condition and my slow internet as my emails swelled to over 12,000. I promise to click all the bloggers who support me so sincerely and faithfully. I shall check later to reward those who clicked to support me during this difficult time. A culling exercise shall be conducted soon to eliminate those who does not even bother to reciprocate kindness when I clicked on their blogs with my painful hands.

SP Lim

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

Day 3.9 ~ Leaving for Inle Lake after the Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp with stop-over at Traditional Umbrella Maker

 

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites – ” Of Older and Younger Generations “   3 comments


Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites – ” Of Older and Younger Generations “

Opposites

This week, make two opposing elements come together (or clash in dissonance) in one photo

BY

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My submission for the Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites – is that of this photograph entitled  ” Of Older and Younger Generations “. This was one of the series of the Indigenous Tribe of the Vietnam Highlands during my Photographic Expedition to Vietnam last year.


Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites - " Of Older and Younger Generations "

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites – ” Of Older and Younger Generations “


 

There are so many ways to infuse photos with drama, from choosing an unusual angle to focusing on a strong, vibrant palette. One idea I often explore is contrast. No, not so much in the technical sense of shadows and highlights(important as they certainly are), but more fundamentally: I love the power of a single frame to bring together conflicting elements. Sometimes the result is harmonious, a peaceful coexistence of unnatural allies. Sometimes the tension remains unresolved.

Sometimes it’s a bit of both, like in this recent shot I took at a castle in the Bourgogne countryside, in east-central France.

 

Opposites

These walls were originally built in the 16th century — but were covered in fresh, shimmering ivy. Together, the two elements made the entire structure all the more interesting (and, let’s admit it, more photogenic): heavy and light, hard and soft, smooth and textured, inanimate and organic.

In your photo this week, show how opposites can tell a story about people, places, or objects. The tension can reside inwhat you choose to show — old vs. new, big vs. small, dark vs. light — or in how you frame and design your shot. I look forward to seeing your entries!

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<a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/opposites/”>Opposites</a&gt;

At the Hill Tribe’s Village – Take 2   Leave a comment



At the Hill Tribe’s Village – Take 2
Owing to the number of photographs I had separated them into two albums. This is the second photo album.

The Degar, also known as the Montagnard, are the indigenous peoples of the Central Highlands of Vietnam. The term Montagnard means “mountain people” in French and is a carryover from the French colonial period in Vietnam. In Vietnamese, they are known by the term người Thượng (Highlanders)—this term now can also be applied to other minority ethnic groups in Vietnam or Người dân tộc thiểu số (literally, “minority people”). Earlier they were referred to pejoratively as the mọi.

History

In 1962, the population of the Degar people in the Central Highlands was estimated to number as many as one million. Today, the population is approximately four million, of whom about one million are Degars. The 30 or so Degar tribes in the Central Highlands comprise more than six different ethnic groups who speak languages drawn primarily from the Malayo-Polynesian, Tai, and Mon–Khmer language families. The main tribes, in order of population, are the Jarai, Rhade, Bahnar, Koho, Mnong, and Stieng.

Originally inhabitants of the coastal areas of the region, they were driven to the uninhabited mountainous areas by invading Vietnamese and Cambodians beginning prior to the 9th century.

Although French Roman Catholic missionaries converted some Degar in the nineteenth century, American missionaries made more of an impact in the 1930s, and many Degar are now Protestant. Of the approximately one million Degar, close to half are Protestant, while around 200,000 are Roman Catholic. This made Vietnam’s Communist Party suspicious of the Degar, particularly during the Vietnam War, since it was thought that they would be more inclined to help the predominantly Christian American forces.

In 1950, the French government established the Central Highlands as the Pays Montagnard du Sud (PMS) under the authority of Vietnamese Emperor Bảo Đại, whom the French had installed as nominal chief of state in 1949 as an alternative to Ho Chi Minh’s North Vietnam. In the mid-1950s, the once-isolated Degar began experiencing more contact with outsiders after the Vietnamese government launched efforts to gain better control of the Central Highlands and, following the 1954 Geneva Accord, new ethnic minorities from North Vietnam moved into the area. As a result of these changes, Degar communities felt a need to strengthen some of their own social structures and to develop a more formal shared identity. When the French withdrew from Vietnam and recognized a Vietnamese government, Degar political independence was drastically diminished.

The Degar have a long history of tensions with the Vietnamese majority. While the Vietnamese are themselves heterogeneous, they generally share a common language and culture and have developed and maintained the dominant social institutions of Vietnam. The Degar do not share that heritage. There have been conflicts between the two groups over many issues, including land ownership, language and cultural preservation, access to education and resources, and political representation.

In 1958, the Degar launched a movement known as BAJARAKA (the name is made up of the first letters of prominent tribes; similar to the later Nicaraguan Misurasata) to unite the tribes against the Vietnamese. There was a related, well-organized political and (occasionally) military force within the Degar communities known by the French acronym, FULRO, or United Front for the Liberation of Oppressed Races. FULRO’s objectives were autonomy for the Degar tribes.

As the Vietnam War began to loom on the horizon, both South Vietnamese and American policy makers sought to begin training troops from minority groups in the Vietnamese populace. The U.S. Mission to Saigon sponsored the training of the Degar in unconventional warfare by American Special Forces. These newly trained Degar were seen as a potential ally in the Central Highlands area to stop Viet Cong activity in the region and a means of preventing further spread of Viet Cong sympathy. Later, their participation would become much more important as the Ho Chi Minh trail, the North Vietnamese supply line for Viet Cong forces in the south, grew. The U.S. military, particularly the U.S. Army’s Special Forces, developed base camps in the area and recruited the Degar. Because of their quiet resolve and skills in tracking, roughly 40,000 fought alongside American soldiers and became a major part of the U.S. military effort in the Highlands and I Corps, the northernmost region of South Vietnam.

In 1967, the Viet Cong slaughtered 252 Degar in the village of Dak Son, home to 2000 Highlanders, known as the Dak Son Massacre, in revenge for the Degar’s support and allegiance with the Republic of Vietnam. In 1975 thousands of Degar fled to Cambodia after the fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese Army, fearing that the new government would launch reprisals against them because they had aided the U.S. Army. The U.S. military resettled some Degar in the United States, primarily in North Carolina, but these evacuees numbered less than two thousand. In addition, the Vietnamese government has steadily displaced thousands of villagers from Vietnam’s central highlands, to use the fertile land for coffee plantations.

Outside of southeast Asia, the largest community of Montagnards in the world is located in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA.

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia

At the Hill Tribe’s Village – Take 1   1 comment


At the Hill Tribe’s Village Take 1
These are the photographs taken at at a tourist village in Buon Ma Thuot, Vietnam before we leave for Ho Chi Minh City in the afternoon.

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