Archive for the ‘Just ranting and rattling’ Category

Winding-up on the Festival of The Hungry Ghost 2017 – Near my place of residence   Leave a comment


Winding-up on the Festival of The Hungry Ghost 2017 – Near my place of residence

It is at the Pulau Tikus Wet Market, Penang with a Hokkien Wayang as added entertainment.

SP Lim

Winding-up on the Festival of The Hungry Ghost 2017 – Near my place of residence is at the Pulau Tikus Wet Market, Penang.

Winding-up on the Festival of The Hungry Ghost 2017 – Near my place of residence is at the Pulau Tikus Wet Market, Penang.

Winding-up on the Festival of The Hungry Ghost 2017 – Near my place of residence is at the Pulau Tikus Wet Market, Penang.

Winding-up on the Festival of The Hungry Ghost 2017 – Near my place of residence is at the Pulau Tikus Wet Market, Penang.

Winding-up on the Festival of The Hungry Ghost 2017 – Near my place of residence is at the Pulau Tikus Wet Market, Penang.

Winding-up on the Festival of The Hungry Ghost 2017 – Near my place of residence is at the Pulau Tikus Wet Market, Penang.

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Wednesday, 20.09.2017 ~ First Day of the 8th Moon – The month of Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival   Leave a comment


Today – Wednesday, 20 September, 2017 ~ is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

SP Lim

From Wikipedia:-

Mid-Autumn Festival

The festival is intricately linked to legends of Chang E, the mythical Moon Goddess of Immortality. According to the Liji, an ancient Chinese book recording customs and ceremonies, the Chinese Emperor should offer sacrifices to the sun in spring and the moon in autumn. The 15th day of the 8th lunar month is the day called “Mid-Autumn”. The night on the 15th of the 8th lunar month is also called “Night of the Moon”. Under the Song Dynasty (420), the day was officially declared the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Because of its central role in the Mid-Autumn festival, mooncakes remained popular even in recent years. For many, they form a central part of the Mid-Autumn festival experience such that it is now commonly known as ‘Mooncake Festival’.

 

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

mooncake (simplified Chinese月饼traditional Chinese月餅pinyinyuè bĭngJyutpingjyut6 beng2Yaleyuht béng) is a Chinese bakery product traditionally eaten during the Mid-Autumn Festival (中秋節). The festival is for lunar appreciation and moon watching, when mooncakes are regarded as an indispensable delicacy. Mooncakes are offered between friends or on family gatherings while celebrating the festival. The Mid-Autumn Festival is one of the four most important Chinese festivals.

Typical mooncakes are round pastries, measuring about 10 cm in diameter and 3–4 cm thick. This is the Cantonese mooncake, eaten in Southern China in GuangdongHong Kong, and Macau. A rich thick filling usually made from red bean or lotus seed paste is surrounded by a thin (2–3 mm) crust and may contain yolks from salted duck eggs. Mooncakes are usually eaten in small wedges accompanied by tea. Today, it is customary for businessmen and families to present them to their clients or relatives as presents, helping to fuel a demand for high-end mooncakes. A considerable amount of waste is also produced. According to the Wall Street Journal’s China edition, as many as two million mooncakes are thrown away each year in Hong Kong alone, not to mention the often voluminous packaging.

Due to China’s influence, mooncakes and Mid-Autumn Festival are also enjoyed and celebrated in other parts of Asia. Mooncakes have also appeared in western countries as a form of delicacy.

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony II   Leave a comment


Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony II

Night of the Burning of the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Both of these joss paper images of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun (Boat) of Sian Chye Tong were burnt on the Saturday night of September 16, 2017.

SP Lim

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony II

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony II

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony II

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony II

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony II

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony II The Photographers

Hungry ghost is a concept in Chinese Buddhism and Chinese traditional religion representing beings who are driven by intense emotional needs in an animalistic way. The term 餓鬼 èguǐ, literally “hungry ghost“, is the Chinese translation of the term preta in Buddhism. “Hungry ghosts” play a role in Chinese Buddhism and Taoism as well as in Chinese folk religion. The term is not to be confused with the generic term for “ghost“,  guǐ (i.e. the spirit of a deceased ancestor). The understanding is that all people become such a regular ghost when they die, and would then slowly weaken and eventually die a second time. Hungry ghosts, by contrast, are a much more exceptional case, and would only occur in very unfortunate circumstances, such as if a whole family were killed or when a family no longer venerated their ancestors.

With the rise in popularity of Buddhism, the idea became popular that souls would live in space until reincarnation. In the Taoist tradition it is believed that hungry ghosts can arise from people whose deaths have been violent or unhappy. Both Buddhism and Taoism share the idea that hungry ghosts can emerge from neglect or desertion of ancestors. According to the Hua-yen Sutra evil deeds will cause a soul to be reborn in one of six different realms. The highest degree of evil deed will cause a soul to be reborn as a denizen of hell, a lower degree of evil will cause a soul to be reborn as an animal, and the lowest degree will cause a soul to be reborn as a hungry ghost. According to the tradition, evil deeds that lead to becoming a hungry ghost are killing, stealing and sexual misconduct. Desire, greed, anger and ignorance are all factors in causing a soul to be reborn as a hungry ghost because they are motives for people to perform evil deeds.

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony I   Leave a comment


Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony

Night of the Burning of the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Both of these joss paper images of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun (Boat) of Sian Chye Tong were burnt on the Saturday night of September 16, 2017.

SP Lim

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony I

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony I

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony I

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony I

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony I

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Burning Ceremony I

Hungry ghost is a concept in Chinese Buddhism and Chinese traditional religion representing beings who are driven by intense emotional needs in an animalistic way. The term 餓鬼 èguǐ, literally “hungry ghost“, is the Chinese translation of the term preta in Buddhism. “Hungry ghosts” play a role in Chinese Buddhism and Taoism as well as in Chinese folk religion. The term is not to be confused with the generic term for “ghost“,  guǐ (i.e. the spirit of a deceased ancestor). The understanding is that all people become such a regular ghost when they die, and would then slowly weaken and eventually die a second time. Hungry ghosts, by contrast, are a much more exceptional case, and would only occur in very unfortunate circumstances, such as if a whole family were killed or when a family no longer venerated their ancestors.

With the rise in popularity of Buddhism, the idea became popular that souls would live in space until reincarnation. In the Taoist tradition it is believed that hungry ghosts can arise from people whose deaths have been violent or unhappy. Both Buddhism and Taoism share the idea that hungry ghosts can emerge from neglect or desertion of ancestors. According to the Hua-yen Sutra evil deeds will cause a soul to be reborn in one of six different realms. The highest degree of evil deed will cause a soul to be reborn as a denizen of hell, a lower degree of evil will cause a soul to be reborn as an animal, and the lowest degree will cause a soul to be reborn as a hungry ghost. According to the tradition, evil deeds that lead to becoming a hungry ghost are killing, stealing and sexual misconduct. Desire, greed, anger and ignorance are all factors in causing a soul to be reborn as a hungry ghost because they are motives for people to perform evil deeds.

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

 

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Preparation of the Burning Ceremony   Leave a comment


Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Preparation of the Burning Ceremony

Night of the Burning of the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Both of these joss paper images of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun (Boat) of Sian Chye Tong were burnt on the Saturday night of September 16, 2017.

SP Lim

Night of the Burning of the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Night of the Burning of the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Preparation of the Burning Ceremony

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Preparation of the Burning Ceremony

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Preparation of the Burning Ceremony

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong ~ The Preparation of the Burning Ceremony

Hungry ghost is a concept in Chinese Buddhism and Chinese traditional religion representing beings who are driven by intense emotional needs in an animalistic way. The term 餓鬼 èguǐ, literally “hungry ghost“, is the Chinese translation of the term preta in Buddhism. “Hungry ghosts” play a role in Chinese Buddhism and Taoism as well as in Chinese folk religion. The term is not to be confused with the generic term for “ghost“,  guǐ (i.e. the spirit of a deceased ancestor). The understanding is that all people become such a regular ghost when they die, and would then slowly weaken and eventually die a second time. Hungry ghosts, by contrast, are a much more exceptional case, and would only occur in very unfortunate circumstances, such as if a whole family were killed or when a family no longer venerated their ancestors.

With the rise in popularity of Buddhism, the idea became popular that souls would live in space until reincarnation. In the Taoist tradition it is believed that hungry ghosts can arise from people whose deaths have been violent or unhappy. Both Buddhism and Taoism share the idea that hungry ghosts can emerge from neglect or desertion of ancestors. According to the Hua-yen Sutra evil deeds will cause a soul to be reborn in one of six different realms. The highest degree of evil deed will cause a soul to be reborn as a denizen of hell, a lower degree of evil will cause a soul to be reborn as an animal, and the lowest degree will cause a soul to be reborn as a hungry ghost. According to the tradition, evil deeds that lead to becoming a hungry ghost are killing, stealing and sexual misconduct. Desire, greed, anger and ignorance are all factors in causing a soul to be reborn as a hungry ghost because they are motives for people to perform evil deeds.

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Say Hong Chun or Boat of Sian Chye Tong   1 comment


Night of the Burning of the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Both of these joss paper images of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun (Boat) of Sian Chye Tong were burnt on the Saturday night of September 16, 2017.

SP Lim

Night of the Burning of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Night of the Burning of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Night of the Burning of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Night of the Burning of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Night of the Burning of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Night of the Burning of the Tai Soo Yah and the Say Hong Chun or Boat at Sian Chye Tong, Ayer Itam, Penang

Hungry ghost is a concept in Chinese Buddhism and Chinese traditional religion representing beings who are driven by intense emotional needs in an animalistic way. The term 餓鬼 èguǐ, literally “hungry ghost“, is the Chinese translation of the term preta in Buddhism. “Hungry ghosts” play a role in Chinese Buddhism and Taoism as well as in Chinese folk religion. The term is not to be confused with the generic term for “ghost“,  guǐ (i.e. the spirit of a deceased ancestor). The understanding is that all people become such a regular ghost when they die, and would then slowly weaken and eventually die a second time. Hungry ghosts, by contrast, are a much more exceptional case, and would only occur in very unfortunate circumstances, such as if a whole family were killed or when a family no longer venerated their ancestors.

With the rise in popularity of Buddhism, the idea became popular that souls would live in space until reincarnation. In the Taoist tradition it is believed that hungry ghosts can arise from people whose deaths have been violent or unhappy. Both Buddhism and Taoism share the idea that hungry ghosts can emerge from neglect or desertion of ancestors. According to the Hua-yen Sutra evil deeds will cause a soul to be reborn in one of six different realms. The highest degree of evil deed will cause a soul to be reborn as a denizen of hell, a lower degree of evil will cause a soul to be reborn as an animal, and the lowest degree will cause a soul to be reborn as a hungry ghost. According to the tradition, evil deeds that lead to becoming a hungry ghost are killing, stealing and sexual misconduct. Desire, greed, anger and ignorance are all factors in causing a soul to be reborn as a hungry ghost because they are motives for people to perform evil deeds.

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Tales From The Mamak ~ Part 2   Leave a comment


Tales From The Mamak

15 – 17 Sep 2017 (Fri – Sun)
@ stage 2, Performing Arts Centre of Penang (penangpac)
檳城表演藝術中心 貳號劇場

Comedy Variety | 多元喜劇
* Language : English and local languages

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Having established itself in Kuala Lumpur with three consecutive years of the annual sold-out series, Tales from the Bedroom and the recently well received Tales from the Jamban, Big Nose Productions has finally come home to Penang with their new series – Tales from The Mamak!

Written and directed by Penang’s very own Fa Abdul, Tales from The Mamak is a collection of ten hilarious scenes at the nation’s all time favourite hangout – The Mamak!

From thought provoking messages to rip-roaring scenarios, Tales from The Mamak touches on subject matters revolving around politics, religion, race, immigrants, the economy, social issues and relationships – because in Malaysia, anything can happen in kedai mamak.

Tales from The Mamak will make you look at yourself in the mirror once more, sometimes with disgust. Malaysia Day celebration doesn’t get any better than this!”

[中文]

從思維挑釁到喧鬧場景,《MAMAK 傳說》將為你揭露最辛辣的政治、宗教、種族、外勞、經濟、社會與人際課題。要知道,這是馬來西亞的 MAMAK 檔,任何傳說皆可行。《MAMAK 傳說》將成為你的良知,照一照鏡子看看是否存有醜惡的影子,尤其在這普天同慶的馬來西亞日!

+ + +

Apology for the slower upload of additional photographs as my computer and internet was unstable & slow, even with so much money spent by the Malaysian Government buying billions of RM in the purchase Boeing jets and investing in America lately, the internet system is still slow. Heard some comments that even that of Vietnam’s internet speed is faster than us.

SP Lim

Tales From The Mamak ~ Part 2

Tales From The Mamak ~ Part 2

Tales From The Mamak ~ Part 2

Tales From The Mamak ~ Part 2

Tales From The Mamak ~ Part 2

Tales From The Mamak ~ Part 2

From Wikipedia:-

The Malaysian Mamak are Malaysians of Tamil Muslim origin, whose forefathers mostly migrated from South India to the Malay Peninsula and various locations in Southeast Asia centuries ago. They are regarded as part of the Malaysian Indian community. Indian Muslims are believed to have first arrived at Samudera (now Aceh in Sumatra, Indonesia) in the early 10th century. Archaeological findings in Bujang Valley, Kedah, Malaysia suggest a trade relationship with India as early as the 1st to 5th century C.E. An inscription dated 779 AD that refers to the trade relationship between the Tamil country and Malaya has been found in Ligor, Malay Peninsula.

The word ‘Mamak’ is from the Tamil term for maternal uncle, or ‘maa-ma’. In Singapore and Malaysia, it is used by children as an honorific to respectfully address adults such as shopkeepers. The silent K in ‘Mamak’ likely came about as a hypercorrection; since terminal Ks are not pronounced in Malay, a Malay who heard the Tamil word may have assumed there was a silent K at the end.  Although the origins of the word are benign, it is sometimes used as a derogatory term for the Indian Muslim community in Malaysia.

Mamak stalls and Hindu stalls are alike except the Mamaks, who are Muslims, do not serve pork but serve beef, whereas Hindus serve neither beef nor pork. There are also similar stalls run by local Malays.

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