Archive for the ‘Photo Challenge’ Category

Rare past glory   3 comments


My Photography Rare Past Glory

Reliving my rare past glory of winning a consolation prize at a photo contest of the 1st. Asean Tourism and Fashion Fair 2014 when competitive photography took place in the rain.

SP Lim

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The Canon Photomarathon 2016 at Gurney Paragon   5 comments


Just came back from the Canon Photomarathon 2016 at Gurney Paragon with the 3 Themes of Consumerism, Beautiful Botanicals and Light. The event was held today – Saturday, November 17, 2016 from 7.00 am till 5.00 pm.

These are the 3 Themed Photographs which I did not submit. I submitted three different ones of lesser quality.

Just back from the Canon Photomarathon 2016 at Gurney Paragon with the 3 Themes of Consumerism, Beautiful Botanicals and Light.

Just back from the Canon Photomarathon 2016 at Gurney Paragon with the 3 Themes of Consumerism, Beautiful Botanicals and Light.

Just back from the Canon Photomarathon 2016 at Gurney Paragon with the 3 Themes of Consumerism, Beautiful Botanicals and Light.

Just back from the Canon Photomarathon 2016 at Gurney Paragon with the 3 Themes of Consumerism, Beautiful Botanicals and Light.

Just back from the Canon Photomarathon 2016 at Gurney Paragon with the 3 Themes of Consumerism, Beautiful Botanicals and Light.

Just back from the Canon Photomarathon 2016 at Gurney Paragon with the 3 Themes of Consumerism, Beautiful Botanicals and Light.

Developing Your Eye I & II: That’s a Wrap   Leave a comment


BLOGGING UNIVERSITY, PHOTOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENTS

 

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Developing Your Eye I & II: That’s a Wrap


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Hooray!

We hope you’ve enjoyed these assignments, from experimenting with light to editing your photos. In addition to learning some shooting and editing tips, we hope you’ve met your daily posting goals.

Taken both of our Developing Your Eye courses? Congratulations. We’ve introduced you to the very basics of photography, and we hope you’ve begun to look at the world with a photographer’s eye.

If you’re not sure what to do next, not to worry — swing by The Daily Post and participate in the latest Weekly Photo Challenge. New challenges are published every Friday, so we hope to see you then!

Cheers,
Cheri and the WordPress.com Team

PS: We’d love to know what you thought of this course, so we can keep improving what we offer to best support you — would you mind answering three quick questions?

Q1: Do you feel more confident behind your camera?

Yes, definitely.

Q2: How likely are you to take another Blogging U. course?

Likely

Q3: Is there anything you’d like to share? We’d love to hear what was most helpful to you — or what wasn’t!

It would be nice that WordPress.com Team member can make some comments on our submission. Probably they can choose the Best Outstanding or Commendable Photographs so we can progress and develop better in Photography in future. Anyhow, it was a refreshing course to undertake. Thank you.

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Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Details in ” The Traditional Artist at Work “   1 comment


Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Details in ” The Traditional Artist at Work “

I am not an expert on Macro Photography due to my poor patience – by the time a senior citizen focussed on an insect and ready to shoot it, it just flew away. Macro photography in nature is definitely not my cup of tea at all. I am submitting a photograph of a traditional artist painting more intricate details on the Taoist Door Guardians or Gods, in a local clan association heritage building. Detailed artwork is actually  done by his memory and past experience. Hope it passes the Photo Challenge on “Details” – the artistic ones.

SP Lim

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Details " The Traditional Artist at Work "

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Details ” The Traditional Artist at Work “

From Wikipedia:-

A door god (simplified Chinese: 门神; traditional Chinese: 門神; pinyin: ménshén) is a Chinese decoration placed on each side of an entry to a temple, home, business, etc., which is believed to keep evil spirits from entering. It is also seen in other East Asian countries such as Korea, Japan and Vietnam.

The custom of pasting pictures of door gods on doors dates back to ancient China. In theHan dynasty, people believed that peach wood has spiritual properties and can ward off evil spirits so they started making auspicious carvings on peach wood and hanging them around their homes. Following the invention of paper, paper gradually replaced peach wood as people started drawing and writing on paper instead. In earlier times, Shentu and Yulü were the most common choice for door gods. People drew portraits of them on paper and pasted them on doors. In the Tang dynasty, two generals – Qin Qiong and Yuchi Gong – became door gods when Emperor Taizong ordered portraits of them to be made and pasted on gates in the hope of attracting good luck and scaring away evil spirits. Other folklore heroes and mythological figures were subsequently added to the repertoire.

The door gods usually come in pairs, facing each other; it is considered bad luck to place the figures back-to-back. There are many different door gods, of which the most common ones are Qin Qiong and Yuchi Gong. Portraits of Wei Zheng or Zhong Kui are used on single doors.

 


Details

Discover the intimate details of something unexpected, and share your images with us.

If you’ve followed my previous photo challenges, you’ll know that I am enamored with nature. I love the exotic and the mundane, the wondrous and the earthy. One of my favorite things about nature is her details — the intricate vascular system of a leaf, the wispy patterns in clouds at sunset, or luminous beads of dew on the delicate filaments of a dandelion seed. When distilled down to the details, a weed becomes a lovely piece of art.

“If your photographs aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” — Robert Capa

A macro photograph of dewdrops on dandelion seeds. Photo by Jen Hooks.

A macro photograph of dewdrops on dandelion seeds. Photo by Jen Hooks.

Fun Fact: This image was shot with my phone and an inexpensive clip-on macro lens called an olloclip. You don’t need fancy equipment to capture tiny details!

For this week’s challenge, try to look past the big picture and take a more intimate approach. Zoom in on details in unexpected places — it can be something from the natural world, or it can be human-made. We’re excited to see what you find with your lens.

 

<a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/details/”>Details</a&gt;

Developing Your Eye, Day One: “Home”   Leave a comment


BLOGGING UNIVERSITY, PHOTOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENTS

 

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Developing Your Eye, Day One: “Home”

“Home”

We stayed on the Island of Penang so in the old days when there were no bridges, we took the ferry to cross over the channel towards our home on Penang Island from the Mainland. When we are oustation or overseas and on seeing this ferry, it is “home” again for us. Presently in 2016, we have 2 Penang Bridges connecting the Penang Island to the Mainland. Apology for the late start as my internet was very unstable and I was unwell too.

SP Lim

 

Home with the sight of the ferry heading towards Penang Island.

Home with the sight of the ferry heading homewards towards Penang Island.

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Day One: “Home” — Get Oriented

When you think of home, what do you imagine? You might picture a house from your past, your favorite neighborhood hangout, or a city you miss. And while home is often found on a map, it can also be less tangible: a loved one, a state of mind, a forgotten time.

Here’s a literal (and tiny) interpretation of home:

Developing Your Eye I ~ Day One: “Home” — Get Oriented

Developing Your Eye I ~ Day One: “Home” — Get Oriented

 

What does home look like to you? Share an image in a new post.

Today’s Tip: Before we dive into this course, make sure you’re comfortable with your camera! Brush up and read your camera manual, or explore the features in your camera phone. You’re free to use any type of equipment, from your smartphone to a point-and-shoot, or your dSLR or something else.

Visit the resource page for details on getting started. Remember to tag your post with #developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

Cheers,
Cheri and the WordPress.com Team

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Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Look Up – ” Life Upstairs “   5 comments


Look Up

This week is all about taking a moment to check out what’s going on above you.

Going about our day, we often don’t pay attention to what’s directly above us. We’re more likely to focus on what’s in front of us rather than what’s overhead. Or if you’re like me, what’s below us to avoid tripping over anything.


While I was wandering around the town last week, I look up at a block of apartments. Living a life on the upper floors of apartments is also interesting as our feet do not touch the ground. Even the laundry is done upstairs with the subsequent drying of these clothings. I had not live upstairs except taking my slumber snd bath in my double-storeyed house. Thus, living without touching ground level can be very interesting and challenging for me. My submission is ” Life Upstairs ” or ” Life without touching the ground “.

SP Lim

 

Weekly Photo Challenge on Look Up ~ " Life Upstairs or Life without touching the ground "

Weekly Photo Challenge on Look Up ~ ” Life Upstairs or Life without touching the ground “

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This photo was taken on a rather frustrating and wet afternoon in Atlanta. The rain had made the traffic especially heavy. I happened to look out and up through my window to see the sky beginning to clear. This particular snap ended up serving as a quick reminder to find a brief respite in an otherwise busy day.

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For this week’s challenge, take a moment to look up. Whether it’s the fan above your head at work, your bedroom ceiling, or the night sky, what do you see? Is it familiar? Or does it show you a new perspective on your surroundings? Looking forward to the peeks into your worlds!

 

<a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/look-up/”>Look Up</a>

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Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites – ” Of Older and Younger Generations “   3 comments


Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites – ” Of Older and Younger Generations “

Opposites

This week, make two opposing elements come together (or clash in dissonance) in one photo

BY

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My submission for the Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites – is that of this photograph entitled  ” Of Older and Younger Generations “. This was one of the series of the Indigenous Tribe of the Vietnam Highlands during my Photographic Expedition to Vietnam last year.


Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites - " Of Older and Younger Generations "

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Opposites – ” Of Older and Younger Generations “


 

There are so many ways to infuse photos with drama, from choosing an unusual angle to focusing on a strong, vibrant palette. One idea I often explore is contrast. No, not so much in the technical sense of shadows and highlights(important as they certainly are), but more fundamentally: I love the power of a single frame to bring together conflicting elements. Sometimes the result is harmonious, a peaceful coexistence of unnatural allies. Sometimes the tension remains unresolved.

Sometimes it’s a bit of both, like in this recent shot I took at a castle in the Bourgogne countryside, in east-central France.

 

Opposites

These walls were originally built in the 16th century — but were covered in fresh, shimmering ivy. Together, the two elements made the entire structure all the more interesting (and, let’s admit it, more photogenic): heavy and light, hard and soft, smooth and textured, inanimate and organic.

In your photo this week, show how opposites can tell a story about people, places, or objects. The tension can reside inwhat you choose to show — old vs. new, big vs. small, dark vs. light — or in how you frame and design your shot. I look forward to seeing your entries!

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<a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/opposites/”>Opposites</a&gt;

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