Archive for the ‘Procession’ Category

From my Photo Archives ~ VII   Leave a comment


From my Photo Archives ~ VII

Dear fellow Relatives, Bloggers, Friends, Associates and All.

Thank for your patience and tolerance as finally my internet is back for a while. I am using this window of opportunity to upload my photographs from my archives first. Apologies.

SP Lim

The Kavadi Carrier

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5   1 comment


Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 5

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4   1 comment


Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 ~ Part 4

Penang Thaipusam 2017 with two Chariots of Gold and Silver ~ Part 1   1 comment


Penang Thaipusam 2017 with two Chariots of Gold and Silver ~ Part 1

Penang Thaipusam 2017 with two Chariots of Gold and Silver. This is the latest Golden Chariot effective this year.

Penang Thaipusam 2017 with two Chariots of Gold and Silver. This is the latest Golden Chariot effective this year.

Penang Thaipusam 2017 with two Chariots of Gold and Silver. This is the traditional Silver Chariot of many years.

Penang Thaipusam 2017 with two Chariots of Gold and Silver. This is the traditional Silver Chariot of many years.

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda of Inle Lake, Shan State, Myanmar   Leave a comment


Inserted from Wikipedia  by SP Lim

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda

Hpaung Daw U Pagoda, IPA: [pʰàʊɴ dɔ̀ ʔú pʰəjá]), also spelt Hpaung Daw Oo or Phaung Daw Oo) is a notable Buddhist site in Myanmar (formerly Burma), located on the Inle Lake in Shan State.

Surrounding the Pagoda, and in the basement are shops selling traditional Shan and Burmese merchandise.

Images

The pagoda houses five small gilded images of Buddha, which have been covered in gold leaf to the point that their original forms cannot be seen. The gold-leaf application to such excess is relatively recent. Old photographs hanging on the monastery walls show some of the images in a more pristine form. It is reported that some gold has been removed on occasion to reduce its mass. Although the monastery is open to all for veneration, only men are permitted to place gold leaf on the images. Another part of the ritual for pilgrims is to place a small robe or thingan around the images, and to take the robe back to their houses and place it on their own altar as a token of respect for the Buddha and his teachings.

Phaung Daw U Festival

Phaung Daw U Pagoda Festival karaweik barge.

The images are of differing sizes, range from about nine to eighteen inches tall. Being essentially solid gold, the images are extremely heavy. It is believed that the Buddha images were brought to Inlay Lake by King Alaungsithu.

Annual festival

Annually, during the Burmese month of Thadingyut (from September to October), an 18-day pagoda festival is held, during which four of the Buddha images are placed on a replica of a royal barge designed as a hintha birdand taken throughout Inlay Lake. One image always remains at the temple. The elaborately decorated barge is towed by several boats of leg-rowers rowing in unison, and other accompanying boats, making an impressive procession on the water. The barge is towed from village to village along the shores of the lake in clockwise fashion, and the four images reside at the main monastery in each village for the night.

The high point of the festival is on the day when the images arrive at the main town of Nyaung Shwe, where most pilgrims from the surrounding region come to pay their respects and veneration. In the past, the Saopha of Yawnghwe would personally welcome the images. The images would be taken from the barge and a grand procession would take them to the palace or haw of the Saopha, entering the prayer hall from the eastern entrance, and where it would reside for a few hours. The public was allowed inside the prayer hall of the haw to pay their respects. Then the images would be taken to the main temple in Nyaung Shwe. Since the mid-1960s, the images have bypassed the visit to the haw and taken directly to the temple. It is now usually welcomed to Nyaung Shwe by some high-ranking official in the government.

Sometime in the 1960s during a particularly windy day, when the waves were high on the lake, the barge carrying the images capsized, and the images tumbled into the lake. It was said that they could not recover one image, but that when they went back to the monastery, the missing image was miraculously sitting in its place.

See also

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2   Leave a comment


Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

 

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1   2 comments


Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Sun.
Sun Wukong (孫悟空)
Sun Wukong and Jade Rabbit.jpg

Sun Wukong depicted in Japanese artist  Yoshitoshi‘s  One Hundred Aspects of the Moon, 1889.
First appearance Journey to the West
Sun Wukong
Sun Wukong (Chinese characters).svg

“Sun Wukong” in Traditional (top) and Simplified (bottom) Chinese characters
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese 孫悟空
Simplified Chinese 孙悟空
Vietnamese name
Vietnamese Tôn Ngộ Không
Thai name
Thai เห้งเจีย
RTGS Heng Chia[1]
Korean name
Hangul 손오공
Japanese name
Kanji 孫悟空
Hiragana そん ごくう
Malay name
Malay Sun Gokong
Indonesian name
Indonesian Sun Go Kong

Sun Wukong, also known as the Monkey King, is a mythological figure who features in a body of legends, which can be traced back to the period of the Song dynasty. He appears as a main character in the 16th century Chinese classical novel Journey to the West. Sun Wukong is also found in many later stories and adaptations. In the novel, he is a monkey born from a stone who acquires supernatural powers through Taoist practices. After rebelling against heaven and being imprisoned under a mountain by the Buddha, he later accompanies the monk Xuanzang on a journey to retrieve Buddhist sutras from India.

Sun Wukong possesses immense strength; he is able to lift his 13,500 jīn (7,960 kilograms (17,550 lb)) staff with ease. He is also extremely fast, able to travel 108,000 li (21,675 kilometres (13,468 mi)) in one somersault. (Note that this is more than half way around the world.) Sun knows 72 transformations, which allow him to transform into various animals and objects; however, he is troubled in transforming into other forms, due to the accompanying incomplete transformation of his tail. Sun Wukong is a skilled fighter, capable of holding his own against the best warriors of heaven. Each of his hairs possess magical properties, capable of being transformed into clones of the Monkey King himself, and/or into various weapons, animals, and other objects. He knows spells to command wind, part water, conjure protective circles against demons, and freeze humans, demons, and gods alike.

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

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