Archive for the ‘Training Course’ Category

Developing Your Eye I & II: That’s a Wrap   Leave a comment


BLOGGING UNIVERSITY, PHOTOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENTS

 

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Developing Your Eye I & II: That’s a Wrap


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Hooray!

We hope you’ve enjoyed these assignments, from experimenting with light to editing your photos. In addition to learning some shooting and editing tips, we hope you’ve met your daily posting goals.

Taken both of our Developing Your Eye courses? Congratulations. We’ve introduced you to the very basics of photography, and we hope you’ve begun to look at the world with a photographer’s eye.

If you’re not sure what to do next, not to worry — swing by The Daily Post and participate in the latest Weekly Photo Challenge. New challenges are published every Friday, so we hope to see you then!

Cheers,
Cheri and the WordPress.com Team

PS: We’d love to know what you thought of this course, so we can keep improving what we offer to best support you — would you mind answering three quick questions?

Q1: Do you feel more confident behind your camera?

Yes, definitely.

Q2: How likely are you to take another Blogging U. course?

Likely

Q3: Is there anything you’d like to share? We’d love to hear what was most helpful to you — or what wasn’t!

It would be nice that WordPress.com Team member can make some comments on our submission. Probably they can choose the Best Outstanding or Commendable Photographs so we can progress and develop better in Photography in future. Anyhow, it was a refreshing course to undertake. Thank you.

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Developing Your Eye ~ Day Six: “Solitude” — The Rule of Thirds   Leave a comment


BLOGGING UNIVERSITY, PHOTOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENTS

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Developing Your Eye ~ Day Six: “Solitude” — The Rule of Thirds

My submission for the theme “Solitude” is a snap-shot extracted from a play.

SP Lim

Developing Your Eye I, Day Six: “Solitude”

Developing Your Eye I, Day Six: “Solitude”

 


Developing Your Eye ~ Day Six: “Solitude” — The Rule of Thirds

Day Six: “Solitude” — The Rule of Thirds

Today, let’s capture solitude: the state of being alone, or a lonely and uninhabited place. What does this word look like to you?

Find inspiration in this shot of a lone girl sitting in the sand at Lanikai Beach in Oahu, Hawaii:

 

Day Six: “Solitude” — The Rule of Thirds Today, let’s capture solitude: the state of being alone, or a lonely and uninhabited place.

Day Six: “Solitude” — The Rule of Thirds
Today, let’s capture solitude: the state of being alone, or a lonely and uninhabited place.

Today’s Tip: Pay attention to the placement of your subject. As you frame your shot, consider the Rule of Thirds, which is a great introductory lesson in composition. Divide your shot into thirds, both horizontally and vertically, so you get nine parts:

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Place your subject at the intersections of these lines (or along them) to create a dynamic, off-center composition.

Visit the resource page for details on the Rule of Thirds. Remember to tag your post with #developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

Publish a new post

Cheers,

Cheri and the WordPress.com Team

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Developing Your Eye II, Day Four: “Natural World”   Leave a comment


BLOGGING UNIVERSITY, PHOTOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENTS

 

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Developing Your Eye II, Day Four: “Natural World”

My submission for the “Natural World” theme is this photograph “Birds in the Mangrove Swamp”. This photograph was taken during our Photographic Society of Penang’s outing to Kuala Sepetang in Perak, another State neighbouring Penang State. Numerous egrets can be found here due to the abundance of food in these mangrove swamps. We are coming to a bend or meander in the river.

 

SP Lim

 

Developing Your Eye, Day Three: “Water”

Developing Your Eye, Day Four: “Natural World”

 

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Day Four: “Natural World” — Leading Lines

A good photographer is a constant observer. Out in nature, we have opportunities to watch and study a scene, from big, sweeping changes — like the sky at dusk — to the tiniest details, like the subtle bends in bare branches in the Nevada desert:

Developing Your Eye II, Day Four: “Natural World”

Developing Your Eye II, Day Four: “Natural World”

 

Today, capture the natural world: snap a moment outside, big or small. From a close-up of a leaf in your backyard to a panorama from your morning hike, we invite you to document this wondrous world around us.

Today’s Tip: While shooting outdoors, look for natural lines that lead your eyes to different parts of the frame. Study the bend of a stream, or the curve of a petal. How can you use these lines in your composition?

Visit the resource page for details. Remember to tag your post with#developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

Publish a new post

Cheers,
Cheri and the WordPress.com Team

 

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Developing Your Eye II ~ Day One: “Warmth” — The Quality of Light   Leave a comment


BLOGGING UNIVERSITY, PHOTOGRAPHY ASSIGNMENTS

 

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Developing Your Eye II ~ Day One: “Warmth” — The Quality of Light

I was photo-shooting at the Heritage Festival some time ago under a very hot sun. Light intensity was extremely strong and I was sweating profusely like just came out from a shower. Tried this shot and hopefully my circuits in my DSLR camera are not fried. My sincere apology for the slower start as my internet at home is unstable and I was unwell too.

This is my submission for ” Warmth “. Feel the heat?

SP Lim

 

Developing Your Eye II, Day One: “Warmth”

Developing Your Eye II, Day One: “Warmth”

 

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Day One: “Warmth” — The Quality of Light

Photography means “drawing with light.” When you take a picture with your camera, you use and record light to create an image. When we’re out and about, we often use the sun — our most abundant light source — to capture our scenes.

The Hagia Sophia is an impressive mosque in Istanbul, Turkey. If you ever find yourself wandering inside, here’s what you’ll see when you look up:

Developing Your Eye II ~ Day One: “Warmth” — The Quality of Light

Developing Your Eye II ~ Day One: “Warmth” — The Quality of Light

 

The spotlights on the chandeliers — combined with lots of ambient and natural light filtering in from outside — create a warm scene of yellows and golds.

For your first shooting challenge, capture an image of warmth, using the sun as your source. If the sun is nowhere to be found today, not to worry — interpret warmth in your own way.

Today’s Tip: Consider the direction and quality of light. Front light is great for outdoor landscapes and group portraits; a front-lit subject faces the light source, making it even-lit. Side light is fun to experiment with: the mix of light and shadow shows more depth and can create unexpected results.

Visit the resource page for details. Remember to tag your post with#developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

Publish a new post

Cheers,
Cheri and the WordPress.com Team

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Photo 101 ~ Day Eighteen: Edge & Alignment   9 comments


Photo 101
Day Eighteen: Edge & Alignment

Two submissions of photograph can be seen below:-

I submit this first photograph of the Kek Lok Si Temple of Penang with the frame of the stone door as the “edge and straight lines” requirement. I had straighten the vertical portion of the door on the right side, as it was slanting slightly. I use the free Picasa software as my photographic tool in all my photographs.

My internet is still very unstable and the telecommunications company is still looking into the problem/s. To all my dear bloggers and followers, I have still over 250 e-mails to go through and shall click yours in due course of time. I extend my sincere apologies and thank you for your patience.

Photo 101

Photo 101 ~ Day Eighteen – Edge & Alignment ” The Kek Lok Si Temple of Penang “

Photo 101
Day Eighteen: Edge & Alignment

Submission No: 2 ~ ” The New Door Guardians ” with recent re-painting of these Association Temple red wooden doors.

The Door Guardians

Photo 101 ~ Day Eighteen – Edge & Alignment …… The New Door Guardians

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Day Eighteen: Edge & Alignment
At the “jungle temple” in the Angkor Wat complex in Cambodia, Ta Prohm, centuries-old carvings have fallen victim to time and tree roots. Still, it’s a living site — impossibly-hued moss covers tumbles of stone. Visitors clamber over, under, and behind, seeking hidden crannies.

In some areas, walls still stand, their intact windows creating frames and portals. The solid, straight edges of the windows are a stark contrast to the waterfall of stones on either side:

Photo 101

Day Eighteen – Edge & Alignment


Today, show us an edge — a straight line, a narrow ridge, a precipice.

Today’s Tip: To make sure your edge packs a punch, use a photo editing tool to check the alignment and adjust the image, if needed, so that your edge is perfectly straight.

Most photo editing software or apps include a straightening tool that imposes a grid over your photo — you move the image until your edge aligns with one of the straight grid lines, and voila! There are a few ways to tackle this, many of them free:

If you use Instagram, straighten an image with the Adjust Tool. Other phone editing apps — Snapseed, Camera+, VSCO — offer similar abilities.
Free photo editing site PicMonkey lets you upload and edit any photo. To straighten, choose a photo from your computer, then click “Edit” and choose the “Rotate” tab. Use the slider to adjust your photo’s angle.
Photoshop and Lightroom, two popular pieces of software, each have a straightening tool. In Photoshop, adjust a photo’s angle while cropping, or use the Ruler to see the precise angle of your line. In Lightroom, look for the “Crop and Straighten” tool; it’s the first icon on the left in the Develop Module.
You can also use these tools to make sure your leading lines go exactly where you want them, or to straighten a photo to emphasize the “Rule of Thirds.”

Cheers,
Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team

Photo 101 ~ Day Seventeen: Glass, Squared – The Looking Glass of Beauty   6 comments


Photo 101

Day Seventeen: Glass, Squared – The Looking Glass of Beauty

Day 17 - Glass, squared

Photo 101 ~ Photo 101 ~ Day Seventeen: Glass, Squared – The Looking Glass of Beauty

As a regular photographer at a Wayang or Chinese Opera performances, I also photo-shoot of the female performers of this Troupes. One must try not to intrude while taking the photographs of these performers. We always ask permission from the Troupe Manager and/or Owner and especially from these female performers for permission to take the portraits of them making-up their faces and wearing their head-dresses. The make-up is very dark and usually behind the props of the performing stage. It is my preference not to use my flash as shadows shall disappear away thus leaving a flat image. Patience and taking numerous snaps are the important actions of a seasoned Wayang photographer.

For this assignment on Glass, I submit three photographs on “Looking Glasses or Mirrors” used by these female Wayang performers to make-up before the performances and the third photograph of the yellow glass sculpture.

Day 17

Photo 101 ~ Photo 101 ~ Day Seventeen: Glass, Squared – The Looking Glass of Beauty 2

Apology as I can only download my assignment only after 10.30 pm tonight as my internet was down from late morning till 10.30 pm tonight.

Day 17

The Glass of Yellow. The yellow glass sculpture with the lighting and shadow designs.

I managed to capture this yellow & white glass sculpture with the lighting and shadow designs.

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Day Seventeen: Glass, Squared
I’ve always been drawn to glass: windows, mirrors, and other reflective surfaces. Glass is fun to experiment with when taking pictures, resulting in multi-layered and unexpected shots.

Consider this landscape from an estate near Inverness in Scotland:

Photo 101 Day 17.1

It’s a lovely landscape, but what happens if we place an old, creaky window between the viewer and this garden?

Photo 101 Day 17.2

Even if you prefer the view without the window, note how this pane of glass introduces a story and adds a layer of complexity to the image. What’s the story behind this estate? Who’s looking out the window?

Incorporate glass in today’s image: a window, a mirror, a wine glass, sunglasses, or something else. It doesn’t matter what form the glass takes.

Today’s Tip: We’ve practiced shooting at different angles and from unique POVs. How can you interact with glass to create an interesting photo?

Look through.
Look between.
Find an unconventional surface.
Experiment with your flash both on and off.
Place a glass object against a totally white background.
Shine an artificial light source on it.
Cheers,
Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team

Photo 101 ~ Day Ten: Mystery & Lighting Effects ~ “Blessings from the Underworld”   8 comments


Photo 101
Day Ten: Mystery & Lighting Effects – Blessings from the Underworld

Twa Pek

Blessings from the Underworld

I had been taking the Birthday Celebrations of the two Taoist Dieties of the Underworld – Twa Pek (Big Uncle) and Jee Pek (Second Uncle) for two years. It was extremely difficult as no flash can be used at all times. The time of the celebrations was usually from 9.00 pm till midnight. So, as photographer I tried to manage somehow. As these Dieties are from the Taoist Underworld, certain rituals and rules must be followed closely or you shall be inflicted with bad luck and cursed with severe sickness with mental disorders. This is the risk I must undertake as photographer and was glad a fellow French photographer of Brazilian nationality, Bertrand Linet was around me to give guidance. He was the one who brought a local boy, me, to see and photograph this Taoist Ceremony. I managed to shoot this Ceremony safely as I followed the regulations very closely.

The photograph showed a devotee being blessed by the Jee Pek medium in trance for health and wealth, with a feather fan on his head. The lighting from the numerous candles and paper lanterns lit the devotee’s face and his shadow deepened the darkness on the medium’s face. As high ISO of 20,000 f.4 at 1/60 sec was used the photograph has some noise but further heightened the mysterious mood of the composition.

SP Lim
Photographer who had some Taoist Underworld blessings from the Ceremony.

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Photo 101
Day Ten: Mystery & Lighting Effects

A photograph can create a mood and communicate an idea that transcends its subject. At this performance at the 2013 Montreal Jazz Festival, there was a sense of anticipation, enhanced by dramatic stage lighting that revealed silhouettes of the musicians.

What were we about to watch and hear? It was a mystery:

Photo – not included

Today, share an image that creates a sense of mystery. A lone mitten on the sidewalk. A trail leading off into the distance. Your dog’s deep brown eyes. Intrigue us with uncertainty.

Today’s Tip: To stretch yourself, manipulate the light available to you to create a particular effect — use it to cast shadows and highlights to create a moody image. Work with natural light, or find an artificial light source like the stage lights above.

The direction of light has a big impact on your photos. Things lit from the front have few shadows, and are evenly lit. When the light comes from the side, shadows and highlights are introduced, creating more texture and complexity. Lighting from behind throws things into sharp relief, silhouetting your subject.

Not sure where to start?

Take your photo during the “Golden Hour”: the time just after sunrise or before sunset when natural light is soft and takes on color tones of its own.
Illuminate your subject with a flashlight or candle.
Take a street shot, using car headlights or street lamps to light your scene.
Try a photo during the day when the bulk of the sun is hidden, revealing patches or bursting rays of light.
Working with light is, at heart, what photography is all about.

Cheers,
Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team

Photo ~ Day Nine: Warmth & the Quality of Light ~ Worker at the Charcoal Kiln   11 comments


Photo 101
Day Nine: Warmth & the Quality of Light

Worker of the Charcoal Kiln

The caption alone suggests a hot and dusty place. The charcoal kilns are extremely warm but still bearable but it was equally dark.
The sunlight was coming from the side door and from the back portion of the kiln. Using flash will destroy the ambience and give unusual shadows that shall be unartistic. So I made do with higher ISO and tried to hold still a few seconds longer without the use of tripod. The charcoal worker was sieving for bigger pieces of the charcoal from the ashes. These small pieces of charcoal are very useful for grilling of satay and making cakes or biscuits.

SP Lim

PSP Outing KSepetang 3157

Photo 101
Day Nine: Warmth & the Quality of Light
Photography means “drawing with light,” and when you snap a picture with your camera, you use and record light to create an image.

When we’re out and about, we use the sun — our most abundant light source — to capture our scenes.

The Hagia Sophia is an impressive mosque in Istanbul, Turkey. If you ever find yourself wandering inside, here’s what you’ll see, when you look up:

Photo: not included

We can also use alternate and artificial sources, like candles and lamps, to create certain effects and manipulate an image’s overall mood (which we’ll talk more about tomorrow).

The numerous spotlights on the chandeliers — combined with lots of ambient and natural light filtering in from outside — create a warm, rich, and even scene of yellows and golds.

Today, capture an image of warmth, using the sun as your source. And if the sun is nowhere to be found, don’t worry! You can interpret warmth in a different way.

Today’s Tip: If you’d like to experiment more, consider the direction and quality of light. First, let’s talk about front light and side light.

Front light is great for outdoor landscapes and group portraits, and can certainly capture warmth. Side light is fun to experiment with, especially for portraiture, fine art, and architecture.

A front-lit subject faces the light source and is even-lit and flat, primarily without shadows. Front light is the most straightforward to work with, but isn’t as dramatic.

When you light a subject from the side, the mix of light and shadow shows more depth and reveals textures, patterns, and complexities (even flaws) in the shot. It can create unexpected results, and be more dramatic.

Cheers,
Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team

Photo 101 : Day Four: Bliss & Captions   Leave a comment


Day Four: Bliss & Captions

What is your idea of bliss? Is it an image of your family, laughing at the dinner table? A state of total relaxation, while lying on the beach? Your latest painting, drying on the canvas?

Bliss – My Photography and Music

These are my blissful objects – my Canon DSLR’s EOS 400D and 40D triggering my photography passion. I had been taking film photography from my school days but was never passion with it. During the course of my work as a Sales Manager, I had taken a lot of merchandising and display photographs of high traffic outlets and retail stores. It is only after retirement and the passing away of my late wife that I took photography more passionately and seriously but at a late age. Anyhow I enjoy photography and always perfect my skills to the maximum of my limited ability.

My other passion that brings bliss into my life is music. When I am young I was given piano lessons but stopped after a year as I was not interested. However, I continued to listen to radio of pop songs and later graduated to jazz fusion. My late wife and my sister are music teachers of piano and electronic organ. Probably I has a reasonably large collection of more than 600 CD’s of Jazz in every streams. My music CD’s of Pop Music and Jazz is my other passion.

Both are my blissful passion at my retired age.

SP Lim
Aged photographer and music lover.

Cameras and Compact Dics.

These are my blissful objects – my Canon DSLR’s EOS 400D and 40D triggering my photography passion. My music from my collection of CD’s of Pop Music and Jazz is my other passion.

Day Four: Bliss & Captions

Bliss: complete happiness, great joy, paradise, or heaven.

WordPress.com editor Cheri loves writing and thinking about the objects of our analog past, so this vintage Underwood typewriter, on display outside of a coffee shop, is an image of bliss for her:

Photo: not included

An Underwood typewriter, on display in Sebastopol, California.
Publish an image that represents bliss to you.

Today’s Tip: Do you see the short description underneath the photo? That’s called a caption. Captions are optional fields that provide more information about your images, like the location, the date it was taken, and other details.

Add a caption to your image of bliss. To do this, click on the image in your Media Library, where you’ll find all of your blog’s images. There, you can edit different fields. For the Caption, a short description — no more than a line or two — is perfect!

Notice the other fields? They’re optional too, but feel free to fill these in if you’d like. Update the Title of the image so it’s identifiable, and add a brief description in the Alt Text field, which controls the text that might replace the image on slow-loading sites, or for readers using assistive technology. Lastly, add text to the Description field if you’d like to display accompanying text on the image’s attachment page.

Remember, the official course tag is photo101 (one word, no space). Don’t forget to tag your posts so we can find your submissions in the Reader!

Cheers,
Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team

Photo 101: Day Three: Water & Orientation   16 comments


Day Three: Water & Orientation

Water – Livelihood

I had the opportunity of photo-shooting a fisherman casting his net near the beach. Here are two versions of the fishermen in landscape and portrait formats. My preference is the landscape or horizontal format as it emphasizes the size of the fishing net and casting action of the fisherman to catch any fish. The portrait format has parts of the large fishing net cropped away thus focussing on the fishermen but the lighting did not permit a finer details of the fishermen face so defeats the purpose of the photograph. The weather was sometimes sunny and cloudy with an approaching storm in the late afternoon. It rained half an hour later after the shoot. These are my opinions and I do welcome the trainers’ and other bloggers’ inputs.

SP Lim

SgBatu Outing70D Part 260

SgBatu Outing70D Part 285

Day Three: Water & Orientation
We have different relationships to and stories about water: how it has saved or defeated us. How it reminds us of family vacations, outdoor adventures, or the hot summers of our childhood. How it might symbolize a place we’ve left behind, or a location we dream to go.

Here’s Tomales Bay in Northern California at dusk, before a nighttime kayak ride:
Photo – not included
Remember: The official course tag is photo101 (one word, no space). Don’t forget to tag your posts so we can find your submissions in the Reader!

How will you interpret this theme? How can you tell a story with water?

Today’s Tip: Ever wonder whether a photograph will work better horizontally or vertically? It’s a great question to ask when looking through your viewfinder! Humans have binocular vision — which means we have two eyes, adjacent to one another — and naturally scan a scene along a horizontal, rather than vertical, plane.

After you snap your picture, rotate your camera and take a shot from the other orientation — horizontally if you first took the picture vertically, and vice versa. If you’re aiming for an establishing shot, what orientation works better? How does a vertical shot affect your scene?

In your street shot, you established a scene with a background, foreground, and a focal point within it. Apply this thinking to your water shot — and to your upcoming photographs this month. The tips in this course are cumulative, which means these shooting tips all work together to help you create better photographs!

You’re welcome to publish one or both versions of your image — and are free to talk about your shooting process, too.
Cheers,
Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team

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