Archive for the ‘Buddhist’ Tag

Funeral of the late Seevaraju Muniandy   Leave a comment


Funeral of the late Seevaraju Muniandy, our Wesak Procession Vice-Chairman 2015 today – Saturday, November 14, 2015.

Funeral of the late Seevaraju Muniandy, our Wesak Procession Vice-Chairman 2015 today – Saturday, November 14, 2015. The Acting Chairman was Adrian Pau Kah Kheng as I was in Vietnam on a Photography Expedition during the 2015 Wesak Day. He had served the Wesak Procession diligently and loyally for the past 45 years. I have only served for about 30 over years compared to his record. We shall certainly missed him at the 2016 Wesak Procession when he came to our meetings in his “Honda No-door” – his faithful motor-cycle,


The funeral procession route was from his house at 18, Gerbang Erksine, Penang turning left to Jalan Mount Erskine > Jalan Bagan Jermal > Jalan Tanjung Tokong (passing by Balai Bomba & Penyelamat Bagan Jermal where Raju stayed for 5 years in the quarters as he was a fire-man) > Jalan Fettes > Jalan Mount Erskine turning into Mount Erskine Crematorium for cremation. His coffin was carried all the way along this route. His urn of ashes shall be kept at a hall next to this crematorium here.

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Wat of the largest Reclining Buddha in South East Asia, Kelantan, Malaysia   Leave a comment


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This is the very first Thai Buddhist Wat we visited on arriving at Kota Bharu after the 7 hours’ of travelling by Albert’s car via the East-West Highway but not encountering any elephants along the way. This Wat had the largest reclining Buddha in Malaysia and perhaps South East Asia. While Daewi and Bago in Burma have the largest and second largest reclining Buddha image in the World.

SP Lim

Sometimes when I think how good my book can be, I can hardly breathe. — Truman Capote

Photoshoot in Ipoh and Chemor, Perak   1 comment


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An interesting quick trip to Ipoh, Chemor and Cameron Highlands for a leisure photoshoot with good food. However, the weather was cloudy and there was a slight drizzle with the sun shying away.

SP Lim

LongQuan Temple of Shantou, China   Leave a comment


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After visiting so many Temples in the Fujian Tour, I forgot about the names of some of the Temples. As I was educated in the English medium, well reading Chinese characters is “Greek” to me. Let me check and confirm if the name is correct. I can remember the Pagoda or Tower of this Temple has an in-built lift.

SP Lim

First stop in Xiamen was the Southern Putuo Temple   Leave a comment


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After the Immigration check, we had to drag our trolley bags to our designated coach parked about 500 metres away as no vehicle is allowed near the airport terminal. After the usual tally of the 21 Penang tourists by the guide, we were whisked away to the Nan (Southern) Putuo Temple located in Xiamen, Fujian, China. Here are the photographs which I managed to capture during the fast 45 minutes we were there. As this is the peak of the Chinese tourists’ season, many local tourists and those from Taiwan were in great numbers.

SP Lim

The Kuan Yin Statue at Hatyai Municipal Park Hill   1 comment


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This is a series of the Kuan Yin Statue in Hatyai, Thailand. This is the standard what open-aired statue should look like throughout the whole world. I was just wondering about the bronze-casted Kuan Yin Statue in Penang with the shelter. There might be some interesting stories behind this “shelter”. The people just wonders!

SP Lim

Bon Odori held last night of July 16, 2011 at the Penang Esplanade   1 comment


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From the Wikipedia:-
Bon Odori
Obon (お盆?) or just Bon (盆?) is a Japanese Buddhist custom to honor the departed (deceased) spirits of one’s ancestors. This Buddhist custom has evolved into a family reunion holiday during which people return to ancestral family places and visit and clean their ancestors’ graves, and when the spirits of ancestors are supposed to revisit the household altars. It has been celebrated in Japan for more than 500 years and traditionally includes a dance, known as Bon-Odori.

The festival of Obon lasts for three days; however its starting date varies within different regions of Japan. When the lunar calendar was changed to the Gregorian calendar at the beginning of the Meiji era, the localities in Japan reacted differently and this resulted in three different times of Obon. “Shichigatsu Bon” (Bon in July) is based on the solar calendar and is celebrated around 15 July in eastern Japan (Kantō: areas such as Tokyo, Yokohama and the Tohoku region), coinciding with Chūgen. “Hachigatsu Bon” (Bon in August) is based on the solar calendar, is celebrated around the 15th of August and is the most commonly celebrated time. “Kyu Bon” (Old Bon) is celebrated on the 15th day of the seventh month of the lunar calendar, and so differs each year. “Kyu Bon” is celebrated in areas like the northern part of the Kantō region, Chūgoku, Shikoku, and the Southwestern islands. These three days are not listed as public holidays but it is customary that people are given leave.[1]

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