Archive for the ‘Canon 5D Mark III’ Tag

Day 2.17 – Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)   Leave a comment


Day 2.17 – Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

(13.11.2016) Day 2:/ Yangon>> Heho- Pindaya – Kalaw

After Breakfast at Taw Win Hotel, Move to Yangon Domestic Airport to catch flight to Heho. Upon arrival in Heho, you will proceed by road directly to Pindaya (59 km – 2 hour), a quiet town on the banks of the serene Botoloke Lake. Home to the local Danu people, Pindaya can only be reached by small and windy roads which snake their way through mountain ranges from Mandalay, Inle Lake, or Bagan. Visit the renowned Pindaya Caves, a unique site housing thousands of Buddha images, the caves are estimated to have been formed more than 200 million years ago. The opening of the cave involves a walk past the Shwe U Min Pagodas – giant white stupas which climb out of the ground. Continue on a narrow, winding and historic road (50km – 1 ½ hour) through the Shan Hills to Kalaw, a unique settlement that is situated on the perimeter of the Shan Plateau, which serves as a bazaar for many ethnic groups from the surrounding regions. Overnight in Amara Mountain Resort.

Lunch and Dinner by Own Account.

Extracted from the Official Itinerary.

Day 2.17 - Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 – Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 - Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 – Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 - Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 – Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 - Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 – Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 - Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 – Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 - Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 – Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 - Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

Day 2.17 – Pindaya Caves of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar)

The next post shall be last and final of the Pindaya Caves of Shan State of Myanmar.

SP Lim

George Town’s Street Photography   Leave a comment


George Town’s Street Photography

George Town's Street Photography - Wet Market in the open air.

George Town’s Street Photography – Wet Market in the open air.

George Town's Street Photography _ Care for onions, garlic and other spices?

George Town’s Street Photography _ Care for onions, garlic and other spices?

George Town's Street Photography _ Sundry or Provisions Store

George Town’s Street Photography _ Sundry or Provisions Store

George Town's Street Photography

George Town’s Street Photography

George Town's Street Photography - Friendly Food Vendor striking a friendly pose

George Town’s Street Photography – Friendly Food Vendor striking a friendly pose

George Town's Street Photography - Hardware Stores at "Thief Site".

George Town’s Street Photography – Hardware Stores at “Thief Site”.

George Town's Street Photography - Hardware Store

George Town’s Street Photography – Hardware Store

George Town's Street Photography - Fruits Store

George Town’s Street Photography – Fruits Store

The Second Largest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia   2 comments


The Second Largest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia

I managed to capture the Second Largest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia today – Tuesday, 16 August, 2016 in Bukit Mertajam, Mainland Penang. This paper effigy of Taoist King of Hades used to the Largest and Biggest until last year or two years ago, when a bigger one appeared in Alor Star, Kedah. Anyway, we still regarded this Bukit Mertajam’s image as the more traditional one in the country.

My comments on Facebook:- Now the Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height while the one in Alor Star, Kedah is said to be at 32 feet (to be confirmed).

Other Comments:- 林保宪 BM one is really hand-made in Alor Star one although it is slightly bigger but they are using computer printing cardboard so it looks not so impressive.

SP Lim

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height. " Offering of Dragon Joss Sticks "

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height. ” Offering of Dragon Joss Sticks “

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

Extracted from Wikipedia:-

The Ghost Festival, also known as the Hungry Ghost Festival in modern day, Zhong Yuan Jie or Yu Lan Jie (traditional Chinese: 盂蘭節) is a traditional Buddhist and Taoist festival held in Asian countries. In the Chinese calendar (alunisolar calendar), the Ghost Festival is on the 15th night of the seventh month (14th in southern China).

In Chinese culture, the fifteenth day of the seventh month in the lunar calendar is called Ghost Day and the seventh month in general is regarded as the Ghost Month (鬼月), in which ghosts and spirits, including those of the deceased ancestors, come out from the lower realm. Distinct from both the Qingming Festival (in spring) and Double Ninth Festival (in autumn) in which living descendants pay homage to their deceased ancestors, during Ghost Festival, the deceased are believed to visit the living.

On the fifteenth day the realms of Heaven and Hell and the realm of the living are open and both Taoists and Buddhists would perform rituals to transmute and absolve the sufferings of the deceased. Intrinsic to the Ghost Month is veneration of the dead, where traditionally the filial piety of descendants extends to their ancestors even after their deaths. Activities during the month would include preparing ritualistic food offerings, burning incense, and burning joss paper, apapier-mâché form of material items such as clothes, gold and other fine goods for the visiting spirits of the ancestors. Elaborate meals (often vegetarian meals) would be served with empty seats for each of the deceased in the family treating the deceased as if they are still living. Ancestor worship is what distinguishes Qingming Festival from Ghost Festival because the latter includes paying respects to all deceased, including the same and younger generations, while the former only includes older generations. Other festivities may include, buying and releasing miniature paper boats and lanterns on water, which signifies giving directions to the lost ghosts and spirits of the ancestors and other deities.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_Festival

 

Collecting cultured cockles   Leave a comment


Collecting cultured cockles and washing these for the market was seen at Bukit Tambun a smallish town which was originally a fishing village.

SP Lim

Khoo Kongsi by night   Leave a comment


Khoo Kongsi by night

From Khoo Kongsi websitehttp://www.khookongsi.com.my/history/introduction-of-leong-san-tong-khoo-kongsi-penang/ :-

“Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi, or Khoo Kongsi for short, is one of the most distinctive Chinese clan associations in Malaysia. It is well known worldwide for its extensive lineage that can be traced back 650 years, as well as its closely-knit and defensive congregation of buildings and a magnificent clanhouse.

Surprisingly, famous as it is, its location appears to be unknown to many Penangites. It is situated at the southwest of Georgetown, and its pivotal building, Leong San Tong, is hidden amidst the crowded gridiron of terrace houses and shophouses. To make it to Leong San Tong, which is perhaps the most majestic clanhouse in South East Asia, you will need to tread through an alley between two rows of 19th century terrace houses and bypass the opera stage, before you see it stand majestically on the granite square.

Khoo Kongsi, together with Cheah, Yeoh, Lim and Tan Kongsi, were known as the Five Big Clans (Goh Tai Seh) that formed the backbone of the Hokkien community in early Penang. Since mid-19th century, having identified their respective bases, these kongsi rooted themselves in an area stretching from Chulia Street Ghaut in Georgetown to the lower part of Beach Street in the south. With the respective clanhouses as the nuclei, these kongsi demarcated their territories with their own terrace houses on three or four sides of the perimeters. This adjoining, closely-knit and defensive model settlement, like a clan village in the colonial city, is a rare form of congregation practised among migrant communities.”

Inserted by SP Lim

FAPA 2014 Photo-shoot of Thaipusam at Lorong Kulit, Penang ~ Part 6   Leave a comment


FAPA 2014 Photo-shoot of Thaipusam at Lorong Kulit, Penang ~ Part 6.

From Penang Tourism News:-

Thaipusam 2014
Written by Administrator II
Thursday, 16 January 2014 09:51

Date: 16 – 18 January 2014
Main venue: Arulmigu Balathandayuthapani Waterfall Temple
Thaipusam is a three-day festival celebrated during the full moon of the 10th month in the Hindu calendar and signifies the victory of good over evil. The celebration begins with a pilgrimage procession on the eve of Thaipusam to bring the statue of Lord Muruga on a silver chariot led by more than 60 kavadis from Little India to the Arulmigu Balathandayuthapani temple on top of the hill along Waterfall Road.
The procession usually starts at 6.00am departing from Kovil Veedu (House Temple) on Penang Street and travel through Buckingham Street, Campbell Street, Penang Road, Transfer Road, Burmah Road, Anson Road, Macalister Road and Ayer Rajah Road before it reaches the hilltop temple. On the day, coconuts are also smashed on the roads before the chariot to symbolise the shattering of one’s ego, to achieve self-realization and also to ‘cleanse’ the road. Aside from that, devotees also make offerings of fruits, flowers and incense to the deity.
On Thaipusam day, devotees will undertake a pilgrimage to the Waterfall hilltop temple while carrying kavadis as an act of penance and fulfilment of a vow or to develop spirituality. Carrying kavadis can be in the form of carrying Paal Kudam (milk pots) as offerings to god or in the form of physical endurance by piercing the cheeks, tongue, or skin on the body with hooks and Vel skewers.
The following day will see the return-trip of the silver chariot to Kovil Veedu on Penang Street from 6.00pm onwards and will pass through Western Road (Jalan Utama), Dato Keramat Road, Magazine Road and Victoria Street. On this day, the same activities that were carried out on the eve of Thaipusam are carried out again along the route of the procession. During this three-day celebration, one can find beautifully decorated make-shift stalls erected along Western Road and Gottlieb Road, selling traditional Indian goods, souvenirs, decorative items and snacks.
For further enquiries, please contact the Penang Hindu Endowment Board at 04-650 5215.

Inserted by SP Lim

FAPA 2014 Photo-shoot of Thaipusam at Lorong Kulit, Penang ~ Part 5   Leave a comment


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FAPA 2014 Photo-shoot of Thaipusam at Lorong Kulit, Penang ~ Part 5.

From Penang Tourism News:-

Thaipusam 2014
Written by Administrator II
Thursday, 16 January 2014 09:51

Date: 16 – 18 January 2014
Main venue: Arulmigu Balathandayuthapani Waterfall Temple
Thaipusam is a three-day festival celebrated during the full moon of the 10th month in the Hindu calendar and signifies the victory of good over evil. The celebration begins with a pilgrimage procession on the eve of Thaipusam to bring the statue of Lord Muruga on a silver chariot led by more than 60 kavadis from Little India to the Arulmigu Balathandayuthapani temple on top of the hill along Waterfall Road.
The procession usually starts at 6.00am departing from Kovil Veedu (House Temple) on Penang Street and travel through Buckingham Street, Campbell Street, Penang Road, Transfer Road, Burmah Road, Anson Road, Macalister Road and Ayer Rajah Road before it reaches the hilltop temple. On the day, coconuts are also smashed on the roads before the chariot to symbolise the shattering of one’s ego, to achieve self-realization and also to ‘cleanse’ the road. Aside from that, devotees also make offerings of fruits, flowers and incense to the deity.
On Thaipusam day, devotees will undertake a pilgrimage to the Waterfall hilltop temple while carrying kavadis as an act of penance and fulfilment of a vow or to develop spirituality. Carrying kavadis can be in the form of carrying Paal Kudam (milk pots) as offerings to god or in the form of physical endurance by piercing the cheeks, tongue, or skin on the body with hooks and Vel skewers.
The following day will see the return-trip of the silver chariot to Kovil Veedu on Penang Street from 6.00pm onwards and will pass through Western Road (Jalan Utama), Dato Keramat Road, Magazine Road and Victoria Street. On this day, the same activities that were carried out on the eve of Thaipusam are carried out again along the route of the procession. During this three-day celebration, one can find beautifully decorated make-shift stalls erected along Western Road and Gottlieb Road, selling traditional Indian goods, souvenirs, decorative items and snacks.
For further enquiries, please contact the Penang Hindu Endowment Board at 04-650 5215.

Inserted by SP Lim

FAPA 2014 Photo-shoot of Thaipusam at Lorong Kulit, Penang ~ Part 4   Leave a comment


FAPA 2014 Photo-shoot of Thaipusam at Lorong Kulit, Penang ~ Part 4

From Penang Tourism News:-

Thaipusam 2014
Written by Administrator II
Thursday, 16 January 2014 09:51

Date: 16 – 18 January 2014
Main venue: Arulmigu Balathandayuthapani Waterfall Temple
Thaipusam is a three-day festival celebrated during the full moon of the 10th month in the Hindu calendar and signifies the victory of good over evil. The celebration begins with a pilgrimage procession on the eve of Thaipusam to bring the statue of Lord Muruga on a silver chariot led by more than 60 kavadis from Little India to the Arulmigu Balathandayuthapani temple on top of the hill along Waterfall Road.
The procession usually starts at 6.00am departing from Kovil Veedu (House Temple) on Penang Street and travel through Buckingham Street, Campbell Street, Penang Road, Transfer Road, Burmah Road, Anson Road, Macalister Road and Ayer Rajah Road before it reaches the hilltop temple. On the day, coconuts are also smashed on the roads before the chariot to symbolise the shattering of one’s ego, to achieve self-realization and also to ‘cleanse’ the road. Aside from that, devotees also make offerings of fruits, flowers and incense to the deity.
On Thaipusam day, devotees will undertake a pilgrimage to the Waterfall hilltop temple while carrying kavadis as an act of penance and fulfilment of a vow or to develop spirituality. Carrying kavadis can be in the form of carrying Paal Kudam (milk pots) as offerings to god or in the form of physical endurance by piercing the cheeks, tongue, or skin on the body with hooks and Vel skewers.
The following day will see the return-trip of the silver chariot to Kovil Veedu on Penang Street from 6.00pm onwards and will pass through Western Road (Jalan Utama), Dato Keramat Road, Magazine Road and Victoria Street. On this day, the same activities that were carried out on the eve of Thaipusam are carried out again along the route of the procession. During this three-day celebration, one can find beautifully decorated make-shift stalls erected along Western Road and Gottlieb Road, selling traditional Indian goods, souvenirs, decorative items and snacks.
For further enquiries, please contact the Penang Hindu Endowment Board at 04-650 5215.

Inserted by SP Lim

Songkran or Water Festival in Penang on Saturday, 13 April, 2013   Leave a comment


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Songkran or Water Festival is now taking place at Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple and Burmese Temple at Burmah Lane. Be prepared to get wet and free make-up on the face.

SP Lim

The best way to become acquainted with a subject is to write a book about it. — Benjamin Disraeli

There is no need for temples, no need for complicated philosophies. My brain and my heart are my temples; my philosophy is kindness.

By Dalai Lama

Evening at Hai Choo Soo, Tanjung Tokong, Penang   Leave a comment


Evening at Hai Choo Soo, Tanjung Tokong, Penang is the name I gave this series of HDR photos I took. We were at this Tanjung Tokong Seafood Restaurant for dinner as my sister had her guests from Kuala Lumpur. It was early evening when I took these beach side scenery. Using the on-board processing of these HDR shots on my Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR. A very convenient feature of this camera for which I used habitually now.

SP Lim

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