Archive for the ‘Chinese Winter Solstice’ Tag

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice   2 comments


Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

From Wikipedia:-

The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese冬至pinyinDōngzhì; literally: “the extreme of winter”) is one of the most important festivals celebrated by the Chinese and ethnic Chinese in East Asia during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).

The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos.[3]After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram  (復, “Returning”).

 

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Traditionally, the Dongzhi Festival is also a time for the family to get together. One activity that occurs during these get-togethers (especially in the southern parts of China and in Chinese communities overseas) is the making and eating of tangyuan (湯圓) or balls of glutinous rice, which symbolize reunion.[4] Tangyuan are made of glutinous rice flour and sometimes brightly coloured. Each family member receives at least one large tangyuan in addition to several small ones. The flour balls are occasionally pink or green. They are cooked in a sweet soup or savory broth with both the ball and the soup/broth served in one bowl. It is also often served with a mildly alcoholic unfiltered rice wine containing whole grains of glutinous rice (and often also Sweet Osmanthus flowers), called jiuniang.

In northern China, people typically eat dumplings on Dongzhi. It is said to have originated from Zhang Zhongjing in the Han Dynasty. On one cold winter day, he saw the poor suffering from chilblains on their ears. Feeling sympathetic, he ordered his apprentices to make dumplings with lamb and other ingredients, and distribute them among the poor to keep them warm, to keep their ears from getting chilblains. Since the dumplings were shaped like ears, Zhang named the dish “qùhán jiāoěr tāng” (祛寒嬌耳湯) or dumpling soup that expels the cold. From that time on, it has been a tradition to eat dumplings on the day of Dongzhi.

Old traditions also require people with the same surname or from the same clan to gather at their ancestral temples to worship on this day. There is always a grand reunion dinner following the sacrificial ceremony.

The festive food is also a reminder that celebrators are now a year older and should behave better in the coming year. Even today, many Chinese around the world, especially the elderly, still insist that one is “a year older” right after the Dongzhi celebration instead of waiting for the lunar new year.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Tangyuan Dumplings of the Tung Cheh or Dongzhi Festival ( Winter Solstice Festival )   Leave a comment


The winter solstice (or hibernal solstice), also known as midwinter, is an astronomical phenomenon marking the day with the shortest period of daylight and the longest night of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere this is the December solstice and in the Southern Hemisphere this is the June solstice.

Dumplings of the Tung Cheh or Dongzhi Festival ( Winter Solstice Festival )

The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese冬至pinyinDōngzhì; literally: “the extreme of winter”) is one of the most important festivals celebrated by the Chinese and other East Asians during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).[1][2]

The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos.[3]After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram  (復, “Returning”).

Dumplings of the Tung Cheh or Dongzhi Festival ( Winter Solstice Festival )

Dumplings of the Tung Cheh or Dongzhi Festival ( Winter Solstice Festival )

Dumplings of the Tung Cheh or Dongzhi Festival ( Winter Solstice Festival )

Dumplings of the Tung Cheh or Dongzhi Festival ( Winter Solstice Festival )

Dumplings of the Tung Cheh or Dongzhi Festival ( Winter Solstice Festival )

Dumplings of the Tung Cheh or Dongzhi Festival ( Winter Solstice Festival )

Traditionally, the Dongzhi Festival is also a time for the family to get together. One activity that occurs during these get-togethers (especially in the southern parts of China and in Chinese communities overseas) is the making and eating of tangyuan (湯圓) or balls of glutinous rice, which symbolize reunion. Tangyuan are made of glutinous rice flour and sometimes brightly coloured. Each family member receives at least one large tangyuan in addition to several small ones. The flour balls are occasionally pink or green. They are cooked in a sweet soup or savory broth with both the ball and the soup/broth served in one bowl. It is also often served with a mildly alcoholic unfiltered rice wine containing whole grains of glutinous rice (and often also Sweet Osmanthus flowers), called jiuniang.

Official name Dongzhi (冬至)
Also called Tang-cheh (冬節)
Tōji (冬至)
Dongji (동지)
Đông Chí
Observed by Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Vietnamese
Type Cultural
Significance Marks the winter solstice
Observances making and eating of tangyuanancestor worship
Date Winter solstice (between December 21 and December 23)
2016 date December 21
2017 date December 22
2018 date December 22
2019 date December 22
Frequency annual
Related to Winter solstice

Extracted from Wikipedia

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice )   Leave a comment


Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. A wholw raw pig was also offered as required by past tradition in the prayers.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. A wholw raw pig was also offered as required by past tradition in the prayers.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. A raw goat was also offered as per past tradition requirements.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. A raw goat was also offered as per past tradition requirements.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. Prayers led by the Taoist Priest for the Committee Members.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. Prayers led by the Taoist Priest for the Committee Members.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. Lunch was hosted by Lor Choo or Urn Keeper of 2016 at CRC Restaurant.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. Lunch was hosted by Lor Choo or Urn Keeper of 2016 at CRC Restaurant.

Winter Solstice/ Tung Cheh/ Dongzhi Ceremony at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang   Leave a comment


Winter Solstice or Tung Cheh/ Dongzhi Ceremony at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang this morning of December 22, 2015…
Winter solstice is an astronomical phenomenon marking the shortest day and the longest night of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere this is the December solstice and in the Southern Hemisphere this is the June solstice.

The traditional East Asian calendars divide a year into 24 solar terms (節氣). Dōngzhì (pīnyīn) or Tōji (rōmaji) (Chinese and Japanese: 冬至; Korean: 동지; Vietnamese: Đông chí; literally: “winter’s extreme”) is the 22nd solar term, and marks the winter solstice. It begins when the Sun reaches the celestial longitude of 270° and ends when it reaches the longitude of 285°. It more often refers in particular to the day when the Sun is exactly at the celestial longitude of 270°. In the Gregorian calendar, it usually begins around 21 December (22 December East Asia time) and ends around 5 January.
1-Tung Cheh Lim Kongsi 021
Along with equinoxes, solstices (traditional Chinese: 至點; simplified Chinese: 至日; literally: “extreme sun”) mark the middle of East Asian calendar seasons. Thus, in “冬至”, the Chinese character “至” means “extreme” and the term for the winter solstice directly signifies the summit of winter, as “midwinter” is used in English.
1-Tung Cheh Lim Kongsi 008
In China, Dongzhi was originally celebrated as an end-of-harvest festival. Today, it is observed with a family reunion over the long night, when pink and white tangyuan are eaten in sweet broth to symbolise family unity and prosperity.
1-Tung Cheh Lim Kongsi 078

The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese: 冬至; pinyin: Dōngzhì; literally: “the extreme of Winter”) is one of the most important festivals celebrated by the Chinese and other East Asians during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).[1] In 2015, the festival falls on Tuesday, December 22.
1-Tung Cheh Lim Kongsi 009
The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos.[2] After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram fù (復, “Returning”).
1-Tung Cheh Lim Kongsi 030
1-Tung Cheh Lim Kongsi 060
1-Tung Cheh Lim Kongsi 100

Tang Cheh / Dong Zhi or Chinese Winter Solstice 2014 Prayers   Leave a comment


Tang Cheh / Dong Zhi or Chinese Winter Solstice 2014 Prayers at the Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi Temple by the Lim Kongsi’s President and the Committee Members.

SP Lim

Our Family’s Tang Cheh / Dong Zhi or Chinese Winter Solstice 2014 Prayers to the departed   Leave a comment


Our Family’s Tang Cheh – Our Prayers to the departed was conducted by my mother and me to our dearly departed father and my late wife, grand-parents and friends at the Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi Temple, Ah Quee Street, Penang on Monday, 22nd December, 2014.

SP Lim

Tung Chek or Chinese Winter Solstice Prayers at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi in Penang   Leave a comment


Tung Chek or Chinese Winter Solstice Prayers at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi in Penang on Sunday, 22 December 2013. The prayer session was conducted by a Taoist Priest for the Trustees and office-bearers of the Management Committee of the Kew Leong Tong Clansmen Temple led by the President Dato Lim Eng Soon. A Lor Choo or Urn Keeper was selected for the ensuing year – Mr Lim Gim Hin was chosen by the casting of the pair of wooden p’ooi. A short presentation of an ang-pow to a new graduate of the Lim Clan was then conducted. A plaque shall be made and place among the Roll of Honour wall. After burning of joss paper, we walked to lunch at Nanyang Nyonya Restuarant at Yap Kongsi building.
My son, Sean, dropped in the Temple to pray to his late grandfather. He was always pampered by the grand-parents when he was young – following them for sight-seeing and trips to Gurney Drive.

SP Lim

Tung Chek (Winter Solstice) and Thooi Nee for my late father Lim Wooi Boon   Leave a comment


Tung Chek (Winter Solstice) and Thooi Nee for my late father Lim Wooi Boon at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang today Sunday, 22/12/2013. This is the first year Anniversary of the demise of my father on 1st January, 2013 as we are following the Chinese Lunar calendar – actually it is short of 10 days till 1.1.2014. As for Chinese tradition, we are required to follow the Chinese Lunar calendar. Traditionally as explained by my mother, the departed are always observed earlier in ceremonies and other celebrations dates ie we cannot observe on 1st January, 2014 as my late father’s anniversary of his demise but only today – Thooi Nee ( First Anniversary ). As my late father was the former Secretary of the Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi Association, he was given the great and rare honour of placement of his Ancestral Tablet in the middle section of the Ancestral Hall. Service to the Association of over 20 years is also a compulsory requirement. I was required to “carry” the Ancestral Tablet for the Taoist Priest or Sai Kong to “bless” the Ancestral Tablet so that it is “officially blessed and in commission”. After the ceremony as usual ang-pows with money were given to the Temple and the Taoist Priest. We then drove back home and I later left for another Temple in Ayer Itam. Then, it was back again for the Tung Chek Ceremony for the Clansmen Association office-bearers for which I am now a Committee Member since 4 months ago. After the prayers, we walked to Nanyang Restaurant for lunch.

SP Lim

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