Archive for the ‘HDR’ Tag

The Second Largest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia   2 comments


The Second Largest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia

I managed to capture the Second Largest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia today – Tuesday, 16 August, 2016 in Bukit Mertajam, Mainland Penang. This paper effigy of Taoist King of Hades used to the Largest and Biggest until last year or two years ago, when a bigger one appeared in Alor Star, Kedah. Anyway, we still regarded this Bukit Mertajam’s image as the more traditional one in the country.

My comments on Facebook:- Now the Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height while the one in Alor Star, Kedah is said to be at 32 feet (to be confirmed).

Other Comments:- 林保宪 BM one is really hand-made in Alor Star one although it is slightly bigger but they are using computer printing cardboard so it looks not so impressive.

SP Lim

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height. " Offering of Dragon Joss Sticks "

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height. ” Offering of Dragon Joss Sticks “

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

The Second Biggest Tai Soo Yah Image in Malaysia, is at Bukit Mertajam at 27 feet in height.

Extracted from Wikipedia:-

The Ghost Festival, also known as the Hungry Ghost Festival in modern day, Zhong Yuan Jie or Yu Lan Jie (traditional Chinese: 盂蘭節) is a traditional Buddhist and Taoist festival held in Asian countries. In the Chinese calendar (alunisolar calendar), the Ghost Festival is on the 15th night of the seventh month (14th in southern China).

In Chinese culture, the fifteenth day of the seventh month in the lunar calendar is called Ghost Day and the seventh month in general is regarded as the Ghost Month (鬼月), in which ghosts and spirits, including those of the deceased ancestors, come out from the lower realm. Distinct from both the Qingming Festival (in spring) and Double Ninth Festival (in autumn) in which living descendants pay homage to their deceased ancestors, during Ghost Festival, the deceased are believed to visit the living.

On the fifteenth day the realms of Heaven and Hell and the realm of the living are open and both Taoists and Buddhists would perform rituals to transmute and absolve the sufferings of the deceased. Intrinsic to the Ghost Month is veneration of the dead, where traditionally the filial piety of descendants extends to their ancestors even after their deaths. Activities during the month would include preparing ritualistic food offerings, burning incense, and burning joss paper, apapier-mâché form of material items such as clothes, gold and other fine goods for the visiting spirits of the ancestors. Elaborate meals (often vegetarian meals) would be served with empty seats for each of the deceased in the family treating the deceased as if they are still living. Ancestor worship is what distinguishes Qingming Festival from Ghost Festival because the latter includes paying respects to all deceased, including the same and younger generations, while the former only includes older generations. Other festivities may include, buying and releasing miniature paper boats and lanterns on water, which signifies giving directions to the lost ghosts and spirits of the ancestors and other deities.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_Festival

 

Saigon Notre-Dame Basilica of Vietnam   Leave a comment


Saigon Notre-Dame Basilica of Vietnam

From Wikipedia:-
Saigon Notre-Dame Basilica (Vietnamese: Vương cung thánh đường Đức Bà Sài Gòn or Nhà thờ Đức Bà Sài Gòn, French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Saïgon), officially Basilica of Our Lady of The Immaculate Conception (Vietnamese: Vương cung thánh đường Chính tòa Đức Mẹ Vô nhiễm Nguyên tội) is a cathedral located in the downtown of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Established by French colonists, the cathedral was constructed between 1863 and 1880. It has two bell towers, reaching a height of 58 meters (190 feet).


Status as a basilica
In 1960, Pope John XXIII erected Roman Catholic dioceses in Vietnam and assigned archbishops to Hanoi, Huế and Saigon. The cathedral was titled Saigon Chief Cathedral. In 1962, Pope John XXIII anointed the Saigon Chief Cathedral, and conferred it the status of a basilica. From this time, this cathedral was called Saigon Notre-Dame Cathedral Basilica.
History

Following the French conquest of Cochinchina and Saigon, the Roman Catholic Church established a community and religious services for French colonialists. The first church was built on today’s Ngo Duc Ke Street. There had been a Vietnamese pagoda, which had been abandoned during the war. Bishop Lefevre decided to make this pagoda a church.

The last church was too small. Thus, in 1863, Admiral Bonard decided to build a wooden church on the bank of Charner canal (Kinh Lớn). Lefevre put the first stone for construction of the church on 28 March 1863. The construction was completed two years later and was called “Saigon Church”. When the wooden church was damaged by termites, all church services were held in the guest-chamber of the French Governor’s Palace. This palace would later be turned into a seminary until the Notre-Dame Cathedral was completed.

After the design competition, bids were accepted for construction. Again, J. Bourard was the successful bidder and became supervisor of constructions.

Originally, there were three proposed sites for construction:

On the site of the former test school (today, this is at the corner of Le Duan Boulevard and Hai Ba Trung Street).
At Kinh Lon (today it is Nguyễn Huệ Boulevard)
At the present site where the cathedral is situated.
All building materials were imported from France. The outside wall of the cathedral was built with bricks from Marseille. Although the contractor did not use coated concrete, these bricks have retained their bright red color until today.

On 7 October 1877, Bishop Isidore Colombert laid the first stone in an inaugural ceremony. The construction of the cathedral took three years. On Easter Day, 11 April 1880, a blessing ceremony and ceremony of completion were solemnly organized in presence of the Governor of Cochinchina Charles Le Myre de Vilers. One can see the granite plate inside the main entry gate commemorating the start and completion dates and designer. The total cost was 2,500,000 French francs (at that time price). At the beginning, the cathedral was called State Cathedral due to the source of the construction funds.

In 1895, two bell towers were added to the cathedral, each 57.6 m high with six bronze bells with the total weight of 28.85 metric tonnes. The crosses were installed on the top of each tower of 3.5 m high, 2 m wide, 600 kg in weight. The total height of the cathedral to the top of the Cross is 60.5 m.

In the flower garden in front of the cathedral, there was a bronze statue of Pigneau de Behaine (also called Bishop of Adran) leading Prince Cảnh, the son of Emperor Gia Long by his right hand. The statue was made in France. In 1945, the statue was removed, but the foundation remains.

In 1959, Bishop Joseph Pham Van Thien, whose jurisdiction included Saigon parish, attended the Marian Congress held in Vatican and ordered a statue of Our Lady of Peace made with granite in Rome. When the statue arrived in Saigon on 16 February 1959, Bishop Pham Van Thien held a ceremony to install the statue on the empty base and presented the title of “Regina Pacis”. It was the same bishop who wrote the prayers “Notre-Dame bless the peace to Vietnam”. The next day, Cardinal Aganianian came from Rome to chair the closing ceremony of the Marian Congress and solemnly chaired the ceremony for the statue, thus the cathedral was then-on called Notre-Dame Cathedral.

The statue’s tears
During October 2005, the statue was reported to have shed tears, attracting thousands of people and forcing authorities to stop traffic around the Cathedral. However, the top clergy of the Catholic Church in Vietnam couldn’t confirm that the Virgin Mary statue in front of a cathedral had shed tears, which nevertheless failed to disperse the crowd flocking to the statue days after the incident. The reported ‘tear’ flowed down the right cheek of the face of the statue.

Inserted by SP Lim

Khoo Kongsi by night   Leave a comment


Khoo Kongsi by night

From Khoo Kongsi websitehttp://www.khookongsi.com.my/history/introduction-of-leong-san-tong-khoo-kongsi-penang/ :-

“Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi, or Khoo Kongsi for short, is one of the most distinctive Chinese clan associations in Malaysia. It is well known worldwide for its extensive lineage that can be traced back 650 years, as well as its closely-knit and defensive congregation of buildings and a magnificent clanhouse.

Surprisingly, famous as it is, its location appears to be unknown to many Penangites. It is situated at the southwest of Georgetown, and its pivotal building, Leong San Tong, is hidden amidst the crowded gridiron of terrace houses and shophouses. To make it to Leong San Tong, which is perhaps the most majestic clanhouse in South East Asia, you will need to tread through an alley between two rows of 19th century terrace houses and bypass the opera stage, before you see it stand majestically on the granite square.

Khoo Kongsi, together with Cheah, Yeoh, Lim and Tan Kongsi, were known as the Five Big Clans (Goh Tai Seh) that formed the backbone of the Hokkien community in early Penang. Since mid-19th century, having identified their respective bases, these kongsi rooted themselves in an area stretching from Chulia Street Ghaut in Georgetown to the lower part of Beach Street in the south. With the respective clanhouses as the nuclei, these kongsi demarcated their territories with their own terrace houses on three or four sides of the perimeters. This adjoining, closely-knit and defensive model settlement, like a clan village in the colonial city, is a rare form of congregation practised among migrant communities.”

Inserted by SP Lim

The Temple of Chinese Hell   Leave a comment


The Underworld Temple of local Taoist/Buddhist Chinese near Kuala Gula, Perak, Malaysia was erected in the middle of a oil palm estate. Thus, there are security guards at two check-points. We are permitted only to enter at the main trunk road ie the road from Kuala Kurau to Simpang Empat as this check-point closes at 7.00 pm. The other check-point closes at 5.00 pm and probably refused entry to us as it was 3.30 pm already when we reached this point.
This Temple wanted to emulate the one in Haw Par Villa in Singapore where the Chinese Hell is featured as a theme. However, currently this Temple is not well maintained and we did not see a single Temple Official when we arrived at this Temple. We saw two Indian Malaysian ladies who were cleaning the Temple. However, when we were going back to Penang at around 5.00 pm, there were about five of them chatting outside the Temple.
Back to the visit as I slowly shot the photos from outside the Temple and made my way slowly to another Temple annexe which was 200 metres away from the main Temple. It was a hill-like Temple with Buddha and Thnee Kong. At the lowest level we have the Earth Store Buddha and the entrance to the Taoist/Buddhist depiction of Hell or the Underworld (please not the criminals). The place was damp, dark and gloomy-like as there were only a few light bulbs working. The cement statues are quite well made and water is dripping all over and making the floor wet and slippery. The complete darkness in the interior of the cave-like exhibition hall did not help greatly in photo shooting as I am reluctant to use flash. Turned to higher ISO 8000 and slowly increasing over 16000 to capture the dark environment. However later tried HDR so as to capture the wider spectrum of the colours. In the Taoist/Buddhist Hell, dead sinners must cross a bridge to enter into hell where they were judged (no briberies or pressured by the upper level) according to their sins committed during their life-time. The relevant punishment is then meted out according to the severity of the crimes so committed. So, there is no acquittal like the trend in Malaysian courts. Every sinner shall face the rightful punishment handed down.
Punishment varies on the severity of the crimes committed. There are many types – trodden to pieces by horse cart, boiled or with hot water or fried, sawn on the head, and many more.
This is the Taoist/Buddhist version of Hell.

SP Lim

Shooting in HDR using Fisheye lens   Leave a comment


Shooting in HDR using Fisheye lens of the Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Burmah Lane, Penang.

SP Lim

Fish-eye HDR combination   Leave a comment


Fish-eye HDR combination was the experimentation I conducted in this blog here. Using a 8-15mm lens and HDR created on board my Canon EOS 5D Mark III.

SP Lim

The Cultural Dancers at the CNY Cultural & Heritage Celebrations 2012   Leave a comment


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These are the Cultural Dancers from a secondary school in Penang.

SP Lim

Dreams are illustrations from the book your soul is writing about you. — Marsha Norman

Thaipusam in HDR   Leave a comment


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This is a series of HDR-processed photographs which I took during the last Thaipusam 2012 in Penang.

SP Lim

Every writer I know has trouble writing. — Joseph Heller

The Clan Jetties of Penang in HDR view   Leave a comment


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The above slideshow is made of the photographs I had taken of the Penang Clan Jetties – a living Heritage site of George Town. There are a few regular or non-HDR photographs in the slideshow. Can you identify these?
From the Wikipedia:-
In image processing, computer graphics, and photography, high dynamic range imaging (HDRI or just HDR) is a set of techniques that allows a greater dynamic range between the lightest and darkest areas of an image than current standard digital imaging techniques or photographic methods. This wide dynamic range allows HDR images to more accurately represent the range of intensity levels found in real scenes, ranging from direct sunlight to faint starlight, and is often captured by way of a plurality of differently exposed pictures of the same subject matter.
In simpler terms, HDR is an image processing technique that attempts to make pictures look more natural. Non-HDR cameras take pictures at a single exposure level. This results in the loss of detail in bright or dark areas of a picture, depending on whether the camera had a low or high exposure setting. HDR compensates for this loss of detail by taking multiple pictures at different exposure levels and intelligently stitching them together so that we get a picture that is clear in both, dark and bright areas.
The two main sources of HDR imagery are computer renderings and merging of multiple low-dynamic-range (LDR) or standard-dynamic-range (SDR) photographs. Tone-mapping techniques, which reduce overall contrast to facilitate display of HDR images on devices with lower dynamic range, can be applied to produce images with preserved or exaggerated local contrast for artistic effect.

SP LIm

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