Archive for the ‘Mid-Autumn Festival’ Tag

Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Cake Festival …   Leave a comment


Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Cake Festival …

Today is the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Cake Festival 2018.

Mooncake

  • mooncake (simplified Chinese: 月饼; traditional Chinese: 月餅; pinyin: yuè bǐng; Jyutping: jyut6 beng2; Yale: yuht béng) is a Chinese bakery product traditionally
    28 KB (3,507 words) – 16:04, 24 September 2018
  • skin mooncake, snowy mooncake, ice skin mooncake or crystal mooncake is a Chinese food eaten during the Mid-Autumn Festival. Snow skin mooncakes are a
    10 KB (1,109 words) – 16:13, 1 September 2018

 

The Mid-Autumn Festival is a harvest festival celebrated notably by the Chinese and Vietnamese people.[2][3] The festival is held on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar with full moon at night, corresponding to late September to early October of the Gregorian calendar with a full moon at night.

Mooncakes, which are traditionally pipi eaten during this pipi festival, have appeared in western countries as an exotic sweet.

 

Today, Moonday, 24 September, 2018, is the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Cake Festival 2018.

Today, Moonday, 24 September, 2018, is the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Cake Festival 2018.

Today, Moonday, 24 September, 2018, is the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Cake Festival 2018.

Today, Moonday, 24 September, 2018, is the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Cake Festival 2018.

Today, Moonday, 24 September, 2018, is the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Cake Festival 2018.

Today, Moonday, 24 September, 2018, is the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon Cake Festival 2018.

 

Alternative names

The Mid-Autumn Festival is also known by other names, such as:

  • Moon Festival or Harvest Moon Festival, because of the celebration’s association with the full moon on this night, as well as the traditions of moon worship and moon gazing.
  • Jūng-chāu Jit (中秋節), official name in Cantonese.
  • Tết Trung Thu, official name in Vietnamese.
  • Zhōngqiū Jié (中秋节), the official name in Mandarin.
  • Lantern Festival, a term sometimes used in SingaporeMalaysia and Indonesia, which is not to be confused with the Lantern Festival in China that occurs on the 15th day of the first month of the Chinese calendar.
  • Reunion Festival, in earlier times, a woman in China took this occasion to visit her parents before returning to celebrate with her husband and his parents.[9]
  • Children’s Festival, in Vietnam, because of the emphasis on the celebration of children.

Meanings of the festival

The festival celebrates three fundamental concepts that are closely connected:

  • Gathering, such as family and friends coming together, or harvesting crops for the festival. It’s said the moon is the brightest and roundest on this day which means family reunion. And this is the main reason why people think mid-autumn is important.
  • Thanksgiving, to give thanks for the harvest, or for harmonious unions
  • Praying (asking for conceptual or material satisfaction), such as for babies, a spouse, beauty, longevity, or for a good future

Traditions and myths surrounding the festival are formed around these concepts, although traditions have changed over time due to changes in technology, science, economy, culture, and religion. It’s about well being together.

Extracted from Wikipedia

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017   2 comments


Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

These prayers shall be conducted on the night of the 15th of the 8th moon – the  actual day of the Mid-Autumn Festival. It ends with the burning of Joss Paper as their voluntary rewards to the Diety for the wishes fulfilled successfully.

SP Lim

Modern celebration

The festival was a time to enjoy the successful reaping of rice and wheat with food offerings made in honor of the moon. Today, it is still an occasion for outdoor reunions among friends and relatives to eat mooncakes and watch the moon, a symbol of harmony and unity. During a year of a solar eclipse it is typical for governmental offices, banks and schools will close of extra days to enjoy the extra celestial celebration an eclipse brings.  The festival is celebrated with many cultural or regional customs, among them:

  • Burning incense in reverence to deities including Chang’e.
  • Performance of dragon and lion dances, which is mainly practiced in southern China and Vietnam.

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Dates

The Mid-Autumn Festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Han calendar—essentially the night of a full moon—which falls near the Autumnal Equinox (on a day between September 8 and October 7 in the Gregorian calendar). In 2015, the Mid-Autumn Festival fell on September 27. It will occur on these days in coming years:[43]

  • 2017: October 4 (Wednesday)
  • 2018: September 24 (Monday)
  • 2019: September 13 (Friday)
  • 2020: October 1 (Thursday)
  • 2021: September 21 (Tuesday)
  • 2022: September 10 (Saturday)

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia.

Mid-Autumn Festival 2017   Leave a comment


Mid-Autumn Festival 2017

Wishing A Happy Mid Autumn Festival to you and your family

SP Lim

 

The Mid-Autumn Festival (traditional Chinese中秋節simplified Chinese中秋节Vietnamesetết Trung Thu) is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese people. The festival is held on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar with full moon at night, corresponding to late September to early October of the Gregorian calendar with a full moon at night.

Mainland China listed the festival as “intangible cultural heritage” in 2006 and a public holiday in 2008. It is also a public holiday in Taiwan and in Hong Kong. In Vietnamese culture, it is considered the second-most important holiday tradition after Tết.

Due to ancient China’s cultural influence, Mid-Autumn Festival spread to other parts of Asia. Mooncakes have also appeared in western countries as an exotic sweet.

From Wikipedia.

Mid Autumn Festival 2017

Mid Autumn Festival 2017

Mid Autumn Festival 2017

The Mid-Autumn Festival is also known by other names, such as:

  • Moon Festival or Harvest Moon Festival, because of the celebration’s association with the full moon on this night, as well as the traditions of moon worship and moon gazing.
  • Mooncake Festival, because of the popular tradition of eating mooncakes on this occasion.
  • Jūng-chāu Jit (中秋節), official name in Cantonese.
  • Tết Trung Thu, official name in Vietnamese.
  • Zhōngqiū Jié (中秋节), the official name in Mandarin Chinese.
  • Lantern Festival, a term sometimes used in Singapore and Malaysia, which is not to be confused with the Lantern Festival in China that occurs on the 15th day of the first month of the Chinese calendar.
  • Reunion Festival, in earlier times, a woman in China took this occasion to visit her parents before returning to celebrate with her husband and his parents.
  • Children’s Festival, in Vietnam, because of the emphasis on the celebration of children.

 

Mid Autumn Festival 2017

Mid Autumn Festival 2017

Mid Autumn Festival 2017

Mid Autumn Festival 2017

Meanings of the festival

The festival celebrates three fundamental concepts that are closely connected:

  • Gathering, such as family and friends coming together, or harvesting crops for the festival. It’s said the moon is the brightest and roundest on this day which means family reunion. And this is the main reason why people think mid-autumn is important.
  • Thanksgiving, to give thanks for the harvest, or for harmonious unions
  • Praying (asking for conceptual or material satisfaction), such as for babies, a spouse, beauty, longevity, or for a good future

Traditions and myths surrounding the festival are formed around these concepts, although traditions have changed over time due to changes in technology, science, economy, culture, and religion.[10] It’s about well being together.

Mid-Autumn Festival’s Wayang   2 comments


Mid-Autumn Festival’s Wayang

This is the Teochew Chinese Opera or Wayang being performed during the Mid-Autumn Festival which is usually the Twa Peh Kong’s Birthday. The Twa Peh Kong is the Taoist God of Wealth and Prosperity.

SP Lim

MidAutumn Festival's Wayang

MidAutumn Festival’s Wayang

MidAutumn Festival's Wayang

MidAutumn Festival’s Wayang

MidAutumn Festival's Wayang

MidAutumn Festival’s Wayang

MidAutumn Festival's Wayang

MidAutumn Festival’s Wayang

MidAutumn Festival's Wayang

MidAutumn Festival’s Wayang

MidAutumn Festival's Wayang

MidAutumn Festival’s Wayang

MidAutumn Festival's Wayang

MidAutumn Festival’s Wayang

MidAutumn Festival's Wayang

MidAutumn Festival’s Wayang

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2   Leave a comment


Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

 

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God  ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 2

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1   2 comments


Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Sun.
Sun Wukong (孫悟空)
Sun Wukong and Jade Rabbit.jpg

Sun Wukong depicted in Japanese artist  Yoshitoshi‘s  One Hundred Aspects of the Moon, 1889.
First appearance Journey to the West
Sun Wukong
Sun Wukong (Chinese characters).svg

“Sun Wukong” in Traditional (top) and Simplified (bottom) Chinese characters
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese 孫悟空
Simplified Chinese 孙悟空
Vietnamese name
Vietnamese Tôn Ngộ Không
Thai name
Thai เห้งเจีย
RTGS Heng Chia[1]
Korean name
Hangul 손오공
Japanese name
Kanji 孫悟空
Hiragana そん ごくう
Malay name
Malay Sun Gokong
Indonesian name
Indonesian Sun Go Kong

Sun Wukong, also known as the Monkey King, is a mythological figure who features in a body of legends, which can be traced back to the period of the Song dynasty. He appears as a main character in the 16th century Chinese classical novel Journey to the West. Sun Wukong is also found in many later stories and adaptations. In the novel, he is a monkey born from a stone who acquires supernatural powers through Taoist practices. After rebelling against heaven and being imprisoned under a mountain by the Buddha, he later accompanies the monk Xuanzang on a journey to retrieve Buddhist sutras from India.

Sun Wukong possesses immense strength; he is able to lift his 13,500 jīn (7,960 kilograms (17,550 lb)) staff with ease. He is also extremely fast, able to travel 108,000 li (21,675 kilometres (13,468 mi)) in one somersault. (Note that this is more than half way around the world.) Sun knows 72 transformations, which allow him to transform into various animals and objects; however, he is troubled in transforming into other forms, due to the accompanying incomplete transformation of his tail. Sun Wukong is a skilled fighter, capable of holding his own against the best warriors of heaven. Each of his hairs possess magical properties, capable of being transformed into clones of the Monkey King himself, and/or into various weapons, animals, and other objects. He knows spells to command wind, part water, conjure protective circles against demons, and freeze humans, demons, and gods alike.

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Mid-Autumn Festival Procession in honour of the Monkey God ~ Part 1

Prayers to the Moon Goddess   4 comments


Prayers to the Moon Goddess

On a moonless Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival Night on Thursday, September 15, 2016 by the Wayang Chinese Opera Troupe from Thailand, the Prayers to the Moon Goddess began with the lighting of the joss sticks.

SP Lim

 

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

midautumn-procession-5d-363

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Mid-Autumn Festival

The festival is intricately linked to legends of Chang E, the mythical Moon Goddess of Immortality. According to “Li-Ji”, an ancient Chinese book recording customs and ceremonies, the Chinese Emperor should offer sacrifices to the sun in spring and the moon in autumn. The 15th day of the 8th lunar month is the day called “Mid-Autumn”. The night on the 15th of the 8th lunar month is also called “Night of the Moon”. Under the Song Dynasty (420), the day was officially declared the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Because of its central role in the Mid-Autumn festival, mooncakes remained popular even in recent years. For many, they form a central part of the Mid-Autumn festival experience such that it is now commonly known as ‘Mooncake Festival’.

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival ~ Part 1   Leave a comment


Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival ~ Part 1

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant, Tai Tong of Cintra Street in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016. Kids are spoilt for the numerous coloured lanterns being hung here. It is also a great opportunity for photographers like us.

SP Lim

Part 2 will end this series tomorrow.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

 

From Wikipedia:-

This article is about the holiday celebrated in mainland China, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and by ethnic Chinese worldwide. Mid-Autumn Festival is a term sometimes also used to describe Chuseok in Korea and Tsukimi in Japan.

The Mid-Autumn Festival (Mandarin: 中秋节, Vietnamese: tết Trung Thu) is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese people. The festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese Han calendar and Vietnamese calendar (within 15 days of the autumnal equinox), on the night of the full moon between early September to early October of the Gregorian calendar.

Mainland China listed the festival as an “intangible cultural heritage” in 2006 and a public holiday in 2008. It is also a public holiday in Taiwan, and in Hong Kong. In the Vietnamese culture, it is considered the second-most important holiday tradition after Tết.

 

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Alternative names

The Mid-Autumn Festival is also known by other names, such as:

  • Moon Festival or Harvest Moon Festival, because of the celebration’s association with the full moon on this night, as well as the traditions of moon worship and moon gazing.
  • Mooncake Festival, because of the popular tradition of eating mooncakes on this occasion.
  • Jūng-chāu Jit (中秋節), official name in Cantonese Chinese.
  • Tết Trung Thu, official name in Vietnamese.
  • Zhōngqiū Jié (中秋节), the official name in Mandarin Chinese.
  • Lantern Festival, a term sometimes used in Singapore and Malaysia, which is not to be confused with the Lantern Festival in China that occurs on the 15th day of the first month of the Chinese calendar.
  • Reunion Festival, because in olden times, a woman in China would take the occasion to visit her parents before returning to celebrate with her husband and his parents.
  • Children’s Festival, in Vietnam, because of the emphasis on the celebration of children.

 

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Photo 101 ~ Day Fourteen: Scale and Observation – The Man, the Offering and the Moon   2 comments


Photo 101

Day Fourteen: Scale & Observation – The Man, the Offering and the Moon

As I am a regular photographer at this Teochew Chinese Opera or Wayang Troupe of Thai origin, I had the opportunity of taking photographs of them at the Mooncake Festival Prayers to the Dieties on the Moon as per Taoist beliefs. Before taking this photograph, I was thinking to myself on how to capture the essence of the Prayers Ceremony to the Moon Dieties in one single photograph. The interesting offering of a fresh pomelo fruit with a lot of burning joss sticks stick into it was a significant one to these Thai Opera performers as it definitely symbolized the moon. As I saw the actual rising at the back of the altar table, I quickly chose an angle to capture 3 elements in one composition. The Man offering the Smoking Pomelo signifying the moon and the actual full Moon in the distance at the back. The actual moon was so small in the photograph while the “man-made” Moon was so large in comparison.

SP Lim

Thai wayang

The Man, the Offering and the Moon

Photo 101
Day Fourteen: Scale & Observation

Last Mardi Gras, WordPress.com editor Michelle W. wandered New Orleans, Louisiana, with an unlikely companion: a tiny plastic baby (courtesy of Randazzo’s, a bakery that hides and serves this little figurine in their King Cake), using him to experiment with scale.

Photo – not included

A park bench dwarfed him. A margarita glass made him look huge. And an old dollhouse at an artist’s workshop proved to be just right. In the photo above, he takes a rest on a peeling iron fence outside an old home in New Orleans’ Garden District.

Today, play with scale: you can use anything and everything to help convey size in your image, from your Chihuahua to your Mini Cooper, to an aerial view or perspective from a penthouse floor.

Today’s Tip: Don’t just point and shoot. Observe your scene before pressing the shutter, considering how all the elements in the frame interact with one another. Make an object appear larger through a ground-level POV. Place two things side by side in an unexpected way.

Surprise us!

Cheers,
Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team

The Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival in Penang   Leave a comment


1-Evening of Lights 051The Mid-Autumn Festival is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese people. The festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese Han calendar and Vietnamese calendar (within 15 days of the autumnal equinox), on the night of the full moon between early September to early October of the Gregorian calendar.

Mainland China listed the festival as an “intangible cultural heritage” in 2006 and a public holiday in 2008.[1] It is also a public holiday in Taiwan. Among the Vietnamese, it is considered the second-most important holiday tradition after Tết.[citation needed]
The Mid-Autumn Festival is also known by other names, such as:
Moon Festival or Harvest Moon Festival, because of the celebration’s association with the full moon on this night, as well as the traditions of moon worship and moon gazing.
Mooncake Festival, because of the popular tradition of eating mooncakes on this occasion.
Zhōngqiū Jié (中秋節), the official name in Mandarin Chinese.
Lantern Festival, a term sometimes used in Singapore and Malaysia, which is not to be confused with the Lantern Festival in China that occurs on the 15th day of the first month of the Chinese calendar.
Reunion Festival, because in olden times, a woman in China would take the occasion to visit her parents before returning to celebrate with her husband and his parents.
Children’s Festival, in Vietnam, because of the emphasis on the celebration of children.


Dates
The Mid-Autumn Festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Han calendar—essentially the night of a full moon—which falls near the Autumnal Equinox (on a day between September 8 and October 7 in the Gregorian calendar). In 2014 the Mid-Autumn Festival fell on September 8. It will occur on these days in coming years:

2015: September 27
2016: September 15
2017: October 4
2018: September 24
2019: September 13
2020: October 1
2021: September 21

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia

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