Archive for the ‘Mooncake Festival’ Tag

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017   2 comments


Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

These prayers shall be conducted on the night of the 15th of the 8th moon – the  actual day of the Mid-Autumn Festival. It ends with the burning of Joss Paper as their voluntary rewards to the Diety for the wishes fulfilled successfully.

SP Lim

Modern celebration

The festival was a time to enjoy the successful reaping of rice and wheat with food offerings made in honor of the moon. Today, it is still an occasion for outdoor reunions among friends and relatives to eat mooncakes and watch the moon, a symbol of harmony and unity. During a year of a solar eclipse it is typical for governmental offices, banks and schools will close of extra days to enjoy the extra celestial celebration an eclipse brings.  The festival is celebrated with many cultural or regional customs, among them:

  • Burning incense in reverence to deities including Chang’e.
  • Performance of dragon and lion dances, which is mainly practiced in southern China and Vietnam.

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Wayang Performers offer prayers to the Moon Goddess 2017

Dates

The Mid-Autumn Festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Han calendar—essentially the night of a full moon—which falls near the Autumnal Equinox (on a day between September 8 and October 7 in the Gregorian calendar). In 2015, the Mid-Autumn Festival fell on September 27. It will occur on these days in coming years:[43]

  • 2017: October 4 (Wednesday)
  • 2018: September 24 (Monday)
  • 2019: September 13 (Friday)
  • 2020: October 1 (Thursday)
  • 2021: September 21 (Tuesday)
  • 2022: September 10 (Saturday)

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia.

Wednesday, 20.09.2017 ~ First Day of the 8th Moon – The month of Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival   Leave a comment


Today – Wednesday, 20 September, 2017 ~ is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

SP Lim

From Wikipedia:-

Mid-Autumn Festival

The festival is intricately linked to legends of Chang E, the mythical Moon Goddess of Immortality. According to the Liji, an ancient Chinese book recording customs and ceremonies, the Chinese Emperor should offer sacrifices to the sun in spring and the moon in autumn. The 15th day of the 8th lunar month is the day called “Mid-Autumn”. The night on the 15th of the 8th lunar month is also called “Night of the Moon”. Under the Song Dynasty (420), the day was officially declared the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Because of its central role in the Mid-Autumn festival, mooncakes remained popular even in recent years. For many, they form a central part of the Mid-Autumn festival experience such that it is now commonly known as ‘Mooncake Festival’.

 

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

mooncake (simplified Chinese月饼traditional Chinese月餅pinyinyuè bĭngJyutpingjyut6 beng2Yaleyuht béng) is a Chinese bakery product traditionally eaten during the Mid-Autumn Festival (中秋節). The festival is for lunar appreciation and moon watching, when mooncakes are regarded as an indispensable delicacy. Mooncakes are offered between friends or on family gatherings while celebrating the festival. The Mid-Autumn Festival is one of the four most important Chinese festivals.

Typical mooncakes are round pastries, measuring about 10 cm in diameter and 3–4 cm thick. This is the Cantonese mooncake, eaten in Southern China in GuangdongHong Kong, and Macau. A rich thick filling usually made from red bean or lotus seed paste is surrounded by a thin (2–3 mm) crust and may contain yolks from salted duck eggs. Mooncakes are usually eaten in small wedges accompanied by tea. Today, it is customary for businessmen and families to present them to their clients or relatives as presents, helping to fuel a demand for high-end mooncakes. A considerable amount of waste is also produced. According to the Wall Street Journal’s China edition, as many as two million mooncakes are thrown away each year in Hong Kong alone, not to mention the often voluminous packaging.

Due to China’s influence, mooncakes and Mid-Autumn Festival are also enjoyed and celebrated in other parts of Asia. Mooncakes have also appeared in western countries as a form of delicacy.

Prayers to the Moon Goddess   4 comments


Prayers to the Moon Goddess

On a moonless Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival Night on Thursday, September 15, 2016 by the Wayang Chinese Opera Troupe from Thailand, the Prayers to the Moon Goddess began with the lighting of the joss sticks.

SP Lim

 

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

midautumn-procession-5d-363

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Mid-Autumn Festival

The festival is intricately linked to legends of Chang E, the mythical Moon Goddess of Immortality. According to “Li-Ji”, an ancient Chinese book recording customs and ceremonies, the Chinese Emperor should offer sacrifices to the sun in spring and the moon in autumn. The 15th day of the 8th lunar month is the day called “Mid-Autumn”. The night on the 15th of the 8th lunar month is also called “Night of the Moon”. Under the Song Dynasty (420), the day was officially declared the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Because of its central role in the Mid-Autumn festival, mooncakes remained popular even in recent years. For many, they form a central part of the Mid-Autumn festival experience such that it is now commonly known as ‘Mooncake Festival’.

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival ~ Part 1   Leave a comment


Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival ~ Part 1

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant, Tai Tong of Cintra Street in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016. Kids are spoilt for the numerous coloured lanterns being hung here. It is also a great opportunity for photographers like us.

SP Lim

Part 2 will end this series tomorrow.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

 

From Wikipedia:-

This article is about the holiday celebrated in mainland China, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and by ethnic Chinese worldwide. Mid-Autumn Festival is a term sometimes also used to describe Chuseok in Korea and Tsukimi in Japan.

The Mid-Autumn Festival (Mandarin: 中秋节, Vietnamese: tết Trung Thu) is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese people. The festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese Han calendar and Vietnamese calendar (within 15 days of the autumnal equinox), on the night of the full moon between early September to early October of the Gregorian calendar.

Mainland China listed the festival as an “intangible cultural heritage” in 2006 and a public holiday in 2008. It is also a public holiday in Taiwan, and in Hong Kong. In the Vietnamese culture, it is considered the second-most important holiday tradition after Tết.

 

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

Alternative names

The Mid-Autumn Festival is also known by other names, such as:

  • Moon Festival or Harvest Moon Festival, because of the celebration’s association with the full moon on this night, as well as the traditions of moon worship and moon gazing.
  • Mooncake Festival, because of the popular tradition of eating mooncakes on this occasion.
  • Jūng-chāu Jit (中秋節), official name in Cantonese Chinese.
  • Tết Trung Thu, official name in Vietnamese.
  • Zhōngqiū Jié (中秋节), the official name in Mandarin Chinese.
  • Lantern Festival, a term sometimes used in Singapore and Malaysia, which is not to be confused with the Lantern Festival in China that occurs on the 15th day of the first month of the Chinese calendar.
  • Reunion Festival, because in olden times, a woman in China would take the occasion to visit her parents before returning to celebrate with her husband and his parents.
  • Children’s Festival, in Vietnam, because of the emphasis on the celebration of children.

 

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Moon-cake Festival 2016.

Display of multi-coloured Lanterns at a Dim Sum Restaurant in Penang for the Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival 2016.

The Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival in Penang   Leave a comment


1-Evening of Lights 051The Mid-Autumn Festival is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese people. The festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese Han calendar and Vietnamese calendar (within 15 days of the autumnal equinox), on the night of the full moon between early September to early October of the Gregorian calendar.

Mainland China listed the festival as an “intangible cultural heritage” in 2006 and a public holiday in 2008.[1] It is also a public holiday in Taiwan. Among the Vietnamese, it is considered the second-most important holiday tradition after Tết.[citation needed]
The Mid-Autumn Festival is also known by other names, such as:
Moon Festival or Harvest Moon Festival, because of the celebration’s association with the full moon on this night, as well as the traditions of moon worship and moon gazing.
Mooncake Festival, because of the popular tradition of eating mooncakes on this occasion.
Zhōngqiū Jié (中秋節), the official name in Mandarin Chinese.
Lantern Festival, a term sometimes used in Singapore and Malaysia, which is not to be confused with the Lantern Festival in China that occurs on the 15th day of the first month of the Chinese calendar.
Reunion Festival, because in olden times, a woman in China would take the occasion to visit her parents before returning to celebrate with her husband and his parents.
Children’s Festival, in Vietnam, because of the emphasis on the celebration of children.


Dates
The Mid-Autumn Festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Han calendar—essentially the night of a full moon—which falls near the Autumnal Equinox (on a day between September 8 and October 7 in the Gregorian calendar). In 2014 the Mid-Autumn Festival fell on September 8. It will occur on these days in coming years:

2015: September 27
2016: September 15
2017: October 4
2018: September 24
2019: September 13
2020: October 1
2021: September 21

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia

Mid-Autumn Festival Mood at Straits Quay, Penang   1 comment


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After the Chinese 7th Moon, we are now in the Chinese 8th Moon when we, the Malaysian of Chinese descent, shall celebrate the Mooncake Festival with colourful lanterns for the kids and mooncakes for the foodies and for praying on the 15th day of the 8th Moon. Happy Mooncake Festival.

SP Lim

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