Archive for the ‘People’s Republic of China’ Tag

Another Famous Temple of Shantou, China   Leave a comment


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I am uploading 3 photos first as the internet is slow. Many more shall be uploaded soon. Apology for the inconvenience. Bye.

SP Lim

The Thai Wat or Buddhist Temple in Shantou, China   Leave a comment


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This Thai Buddhist Temple or rather a Buddhist Temple in Thai architecture was built is Shantou by a prominent Thai overseas Chinese.

From Wikipedia
Shantou (simplified Chinese: 汕头; traditional Chinese: 汕頭; pinyin: Shàntóu; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Sòaⁿ-thâu), historically known as Swatow or Suátao, is a prefecture-level city on the eastern coast of Guangdong province, People’s Republic of China, with a total population of 5,391,028 as of 2010 and an administrative area of 2,064 square kilometres (797 sq mi). With it and the immediately surrounding cities of Jieyang and Chaozhou, the metropolitan region – known as Chaoshan – covers an area of 10,404 square kilometres (4,017 sq mi), and had a permanent population of 13,937,897 at the end of 2010.

Shantou, a city significant in 19th-century Chinese history as one of the treaty ports established for Western trade and contact, was one of the original Special Economic Zones of the People’s Republic of China established in the 1980s, but failed to blossom like other cities such as Shenzhen, Xiamen and Zhuhai. However, it remains as Eastern Guangdong’s economic centre, and is home to Shantou University, a member of the “Project 211” group.

SP Lim

The Cultural Concert from Xiamen Art & Cultural Center, Xiamen, Fujian, China – Part 1   Leave a comment


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This is a series of photographs which I took at the Concert at Xiamen, Fujian, China. I took these photos from a hundred metres or so away without flash using an unsteady tripod. Luckily the photos came out reasonably all right but some were just blurry. By the stroke of luck, I was thrusted a piece of pink paper with the narrations of the cultural performances at the recent Penang Esplanade’s China Cultural Concert 2011. Yes, this is the information which I needed for my photograph series taken at the Cultural Concert in Xiamen during my visit in September 2011. In the haste I am not aware of the name of the venue of the Cultural Concert and the Acts played out at the Xiamen Art and Cultural Concert. Thus, armed with newly dicovered information, I shall explain the concert in finer details.
Act One
There is definitely a symbiotic connection between the ocean and the Min’nan or coastal people from Fujian. Xiamen is itself an island and thus earning a living from the sea is the logical choice. The Act One depicts this intertwine of the essence of the ocean and the Min’nan (Hokkien) culture.
Act 2 is probably about the charming Hui-an Girl and troupe of dancing girls. Well, that reminded my late wife who prided herself as a girl from this region. A thrifty hard-working female worker of untold strength and diligence and that she was, my late wife Saw Ai. Remember those olden days the ladies dress in blue dresses helping the mason, carrying stones, cement and bricks in Penang. These ladies were from Hui-an.
Next Act 3 was the depiction of the fighting monks from Southern Shaolin Temple of China.

SP Lim

The Temple of Light of ChaoZhou, China   2 comments


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Unique tour of the “fort” and Temple of Ligtht using a tram-car travelling towards the Temple of Light which is currently under renovations. One interesting thing to note in China, only local Tourist Guide is allowed to show the the local tourist spots for example in ChaoZhou only the tourist guide from ChaoZhou is allowed to show us around.

SP Lim

Northern Pavilion Scenic Spot Area of ChaoZhou, China   Leave a comment


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The North Pavilion Buddhist Lamp: The North Pavilion Buddhist Lamp is located in the North Pavilion Scenic Spot Area in Chaozhou, faces the Hanjiang River, and backs Jinshan Mountain. It was built in the Song Dynasty (960 A.D.-1279 A.D.) and then renovated in the Ming (1368-A.D.-1644 A.D.) and the Qing Dynasties (1616 A.D.-1911 A.D.). During the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), it was destroyed but later rebuilt by locals after the country’s opening-up policy. Surrounded by mountains and rivers, the North Pavilion Scenic Spot Area spreads over a large dramatic area and has become one of the 8 main attractions in Chaozhou.

From ZhangZhou to ChaoZhou then to ShanTou, China   Leave a comment


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The journey in Fujian continued with the tour bus taking us to ChaoZhou ( Home of the Teochews ) along the highway. There was an intreresting stop at the highway but I did not catch the name of the place. Finally we arrived at ChaoZhou to stop for lunch.

From Wikipedia:-
Chaozhou (Chinese: 潮州; pinyin: Cháozhōu; Wade–Giles: Ch’ao²-chou¹; literally “Tide Prefecture”; alternatively spelled Chiuchow, transliterated from its Cantonese pronunciation; also widely known by its Postal map spelling Teochew,) is a city in eastern Guangdong province of the People’s Republic of China. It borders Shantou to the south, Jieyang to the southwest, Meizhou to the northwest, the province of Fujian to the east, and the South China Sea to the southeast. It is administered as a prefecture-level city with a jurisdiction area of 3,110 square kilometers and a total population of 2,669,844.[1] Chaozhou is part of the Chaoshan region.
Also from Wikipedia relating to Penang:-There is also a large number of Teochew people in Penang, Malaysia. In the early 19th century some Teochew people settled here and in 1855, they founded the Teochew Association, which also includes a temple in Chulia Street, George Town. The community continued to grow until in 1919, a school named after the Han River, Han Chiang School, was founded to provide education for the people. Today, during some large occasions, the Teochew community still holds Teochew operas here. Other than that, Han Chiang School went on to become one of the most famous education institutions in Penang. They have 3 schools, namely SJK(C) Han Chiang, Han Chiang High School and Han Chiang College.
SP Lim

BaiHua Village of ZhangZhou   Leave a comment


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This place surely got my vote for the place NOT to visit while in ZhangZhou. This is a commercial area for selling ornamental plants and flowers with the only attractive concrete structure of cactuses in an enclosed area. As an avid photographer of flowers and ornamental plants, I cannot see any interesting flowering plants to shoot with the exception of the cactus with reddish tops.

SP Lim

The NanShan Temple of ZhangZhou, Fujian, China   Leave a comment


This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Nanshan Temple (Chinese: 南山寺; pinyin: Nánshān Sì) is a Buddhist temple located in the foothills of Mount Danxia (丹霞山) to the south of Zhangzhou City, Fujian Province, People’s Republic of China. It is one of the most important Chinese Buddhism temples on the Chinese mainland.
History
Originally known as the Baoqu Institute (报劬院), the temple was built during the reign of Emperor Xuanzong of Tang during his Kaiyuan (开元) era and completed in 736 CE.[1][2] In 968 CE during the reign of Emperor Taizu of Song it was repaired by the provincial governor Chen Wen (陈文) and renamed Chongfu Temple (崇福寺). Later on during the Ming Dynasty, its name changed once more to the current “Nanshan Temple”.

Nanshan Temple is built in the typical style with the central axis divided into the Hall of the Four Heavenly Kings (天王殿), the Mahavira Hall (大雄宝殿) and a the Monasterial Library for the storage of sacred Buddhist scriptures. Within this library there is a large stone Buddha as well as a white jade one that was brought from Myanmar during the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911), a large clock and a Ming Dynasty (1368–1644) Avatamsaka Sutra. Together with a sutra written on palm leaves by the Qing Guangxu Emperor, these items are known as the “Five Treasures of Nanshan” (南山寺五宝).

The Hakka Clay Buildings of YongDing, Fujian, People’s Republic of China   Leave a comment


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This is my second visit to these Hakka Clay Buildings since my last one in 2007. My take on these Hakka Clay Buildings is that this place has become too commercialized and too exploited for local and foreign tourists. I really enjoyed the relaxed manner when I visited the place in 2007 and we even had a Hakka-cuisine lunch in the circular Hakka Clay Building itself. Now, it has become a “shopping centre” with tea-houses and souvenir shops in every nook and corner. We have to pay entrance which I feel is all right as money is needed to maintain the place. A Hakka Tourist Guide is compulsory and perhaps adding extra employment to the local people. However, we are forbidden to climb to the first and secong floor of these Hakka Buildings especially the bigger ones. This is indeed a deep disappointment to me as a photographer! In 2007 we had lovely photographs of the circular Hakka Clay Building but for this 2011 trip, I did a series of “lame” photographs with the interesting angle of the building missing as one could get to go the first and second floors as in 2007. Anywhere, enjoy these photos while it last as we can still visit these places. In addition to add to my woes, it was raining quite heavily with gloomy lighting.

SP Lim

The Statue of Lao-tzu on the left peak of Mt. Qingyuan, QuanZhou, Fujian, China   Leave a comment


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Mt. Qingyuan is one of the principal tourist attractions in the Quanzhou area. The mountain’s scenic area encompasses about 62 square kilometers (15,321 acres). Also called North, Spring or Qiyun Mountain, Qingyuan’s highest peak is about 500 meters (1,640 feet) above sea level. The main scenic area is about 3 kilometers (2 miles) to Quanzhou City.

The Scenic Area is comprised of three mountains-Qingyuan, Ling and Jiuri. The most appealing attractions here are the Statue of Lao-tzu; the Statues of the Three Buddhas; the Islamic Holy Tombs and the Qi Feng Inscriptions of the Song Dynasty (960 – 1279).

The Statue of Lao-tzu is on the left peak of Mt. Qingyuan. Lao-tzu was a famous philosopher and thinker in the Spring and Autumn Period (770 BC – 476 BC) as well as the founder of Taoism. His most renowned work is the ‘Tao Te Ching’ and is regarded as the basic doctrine of Taoism. His statue is considered one of the finest expressions of stone carving art in the Song Dynasty. Lao-tzu’s left hand rests on his left knee and his right hand on a small table. His face is somewhat exaggerated with a pair of bright eyes, long eyebrows, a mustache and two oversized ears. It seems that he has seen through the vanity of the world and his face beams with happiness. This statue is the biggest extant stone sculpture of Lao-tzu measuring 5 meters (16 feet) high and 8 meters (26 feet) wide.

%d bloggers like this: