Archive for the ‘Prayers’ Tag

The Prayers for the 15th. Day of the Chinese Seventh Moon   Leave a comment


The Prayers for the 15th. Day of the Chinese Seventh Moon

Prayers at the Temple   Leave a comment


Prayers at the Temple

Prayers at the Temple

Prayers at the Temple – Temple is busy with praying devotees

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice   2 comments


Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

From Wikipedia:-

The Dōngzhì Festival or Winter Solstice Festival (Chinese冬至pinyinDōngzhì; literally: “the extreme of winter”) is one of the most important festivals celebrated by the Chinese and ethnic Chinese in East Asia during the Dongzhi solar term (winter solstice) on or around December 22 (according to East Asia time).

The origins of this festival can be traced back to the yin and yang philosophy of balance and harmony in the cosmos.[3]After this celebration, there will be days with longer daylight hours and therefore an increase in positive energy flowing in. The philosophical significance of this is symbolized by the I Ching hexagram  (復, “Returning”).

 

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Traditionally, the Dongzhi Festival is also a time for the family to get together. One activity that occurs during these get-togethers (especially in the southern parts of China and in Chinese communities overseas) is the making and eating of tangyuan (湯圓) or balls of glutinous rice, which symbolize reunion.[4] Tangyuan are made of glutinous rice flour and sometimes brightly coloured. Each family member receives at least one large tangyuan in addition to several small ones. The flour balls are occasionally pink or green. They are cooked in a sweet soup or savory broth with both the ball and the soup/broth served in one bowl. It is also often served with a mildly alcoholic unfiltered rice wine containing whole grains of glutinous rice (and often also Sweet Osmanthus flowers), called jiuniang.

In northern China, people typically eat dumplings on Dongzhi. It is said to have originated from Zhang Zhongjing in the Han Dynasty. On one cold winter day, he saw the poor suffering from chilblains on their ears. Feeling sympathetic, he ordered his apprentices to make dumplings with lamb and other ingredients, and distribute them among the poor to keep them warm, to keep their ears from getting chilblains. Since the dumplings were shaped like ears, Zhang named the dish “qùhán jiāoěr tāng” (祛寒嬌耳湯) or dumpling soup that expels the cold. From that time on, it has been a tradition to eat dumplings on the day of Dongzhi.

Old traditions also require people with the same surname or from the same clan to gather at their ancestral temples to worship on this day. There is always a grand reunion dinner following the sacrificial ceremony.

The festive food is also a reminder that celebrators are now a year older and should behave better in the coming year. Even today, many Chinese around the world, especially the elderly, still insist that one is “a year older” right after the Dongzhi celebration instead of waiting for the lunar new year.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Tung Cheh or Chinese Winter Solstice on Saturday, December 22, 2018 at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi.

Festival of Hungry Ghost or Phor Thor Ceremony at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang   Leave a comment


Festival of Hungry Ghost or Phor Thor Ceremony at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Saturday 25th August, 2018

Festival of Hungry Ghost or Phor Thor Ceremony at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Saturday 25th August, 2018

Festival of Hungry Ghost or Phor Thor Ceremony at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Saturday 25th August, 2018 – My mother’s prayers

Festival of Hungry Ghost or Phor Thor Ceremony at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Saturday 25th August, 2018

Festival of Hungry Ghost or Phor Thor Ceremony at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Saturday 25th August, 2018

Festival of Hungry Ghost or Phor Thor Ceremony at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Saturday 25th August, 2018

Tai Soo Yah Idols of Mount Erskine and Pulau Tikus   Leave a comment


Tai Soo Yah Idols of Mount Erskine and Pulau Tikus

 

Tai Soo Yah Idols of Mount Erskine.

Tai Soo Yah Idols of Mount Erskine.

Tai Soo Yah Idols of Mount Erskine.

Tai Soo Yah Idols of Pulau Tikus.

Tai Soo Yah Idols of Pulau Tikus.

Tai Soo Yah Idols of Pulau Tikus.

Tai Soo Yah of Bukit Mertajam   Leave a comment


Tai Soo Yah of Bukit Mertajam

Tai Soo Yah of Bukit Mertajam

Tai Soo Yah of Bukit Mertajam

Tai Soo Yah of Bukit Mertajam

Tai Soo Yah of Bukit Mertajam

Tai Soo Yah of Bukit Mertajam

Tai Soo Yah of Bukit Mertajam

Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 ~ Part 4 FINAL   Leave a comment


Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 at Ah Quee Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia.

 

Mazu, also known by several other names and titles, is a Chinese sea goddess. She is the deified form of the purported historical Lin Mo or Lin Moniang, a Fujianese shamaness whose life span is traditionally dated from 960 to 987. Revered after her death as a tutelary deity of seafarers, including fishermen and sailors, her worship spread throughout China’s coastal regions and overseas Chinese communities throughout Southeast Asia. She was thought to roam the seas, protecting her believers through miraculous interventions. She is now generally regarded by her believers as a powerful and benevolent Queen of Heaven. Mazuism is popular on Taiwan; her temple festival is a major event in the region, with the largest celebrations around her temples at Dajia and Beigang.

Extracted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 at Ah Quee Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia.

Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 at Ah Quee Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia.

Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 at Ah Quee Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia.

Names and titles

In addition to Mazu or Ma-tsu, meaning “Maternal Ancestor Mother, “Granny”, or “Grandmother”, Lin Moniang is worshipped under various other names and titles:

  • Mazupo (“Granny Mazu”), a popular name in Fujian
  • A-Ma, also spelled Ah-Ma (“Mother” or “Grandmother”), a popular name in Macau
  • Linghui Furen (“Lady of Numinous Grace”), an official title conferred in 1156.
  • Linghui Fei[6] (“Princess of Numinous Grace”), an official title conferred in 1192.
  • Tianfei (“Princess of Heaven”), fully Huguo Mingzhu Tianfei (“Illuminating Princess of Heaven who Protects the Nation”), an official title conferred in 1281.
  • Huguo Bimin Miaoling Zhaoying Hongren Puji Tianfei (“Heavenly Princess who Protects the Nation and Shelters the People, of Marvelous Numen, Brilliant Resonance, Magnanimous Kindness, and Universal Salvation”), an official title conferred in 1409.
  • Tianhou (天后, literally meaning: “Queen/Empress of Heaven”), an official title conferred in 1683.
  • Tianshang Shengmu (“Holy Heavenly Mother”) or Tianhou Shengmu
  • Tongxian Lingnü (“Worthy & Efficacious Lady”)
  • Shennü (“Divine Woman”)
  • Zhaoxiao Chunzheng Fuji Ganying Shengfei (“Holy Princess of Clear Piety, Pure Faith, and Helpful Response”), an official title conferred during the reign of the Hongwu Emperor of the Ming.

Although many of Mazu’s temples honor her titles Tianhou and Tianfei, it became customary to never pray to her under those names during an emergency since it was believed that, hearing one of her formal titles, Mazu might feel obligated to groom and dress herself as properly befitting her station before receiving the petition. Prayers invoking her as Mazu were thought to be answered more quickly.

Extracted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 at Ah Quee Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia.

Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 at Ah Quee Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia.

Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 at Ah Quee Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia.

Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 at Ah Quee Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia.

Penang Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi’s Mazu Birthday Celebrations on Tuesday, 8 May, 2018 at Ah Quee Street, George Town, Penang, Malaysia.

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