Archive for the ‘Prayers’ Tag

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice )   Leave a comment


Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. A wholw raw pig was also offered as required by past tradition in the prayers.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. A wholw raw pig was also offered as required by past tradition in the prayers.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. A raw goat was also offered as per past tradition requirements.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. A raw goat was also offered as per past tradition requirements.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. Prayers led by the Taoist Priest for the Committee Members.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. Prayers led by the Taoist Priest for the Committee Members.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. Lunch was hosted by Lor Choo or Urn Keeper of 2016 at CRC Restaurant.

Food offerings at the Tung Chek ( Dongzhi or Winter Solstice ) at Kew Leong Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang on Wednesday, 21 December, 2016. Lunch was hosted by Lor Choo or Urn Keeper of 2016 at CRC Restaurant.

Arahant Upagutta’s Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang   1 comment


Arahant Upagutta’s Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta's Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta’s Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta's Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta’s Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta's Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta’s Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta's Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta’s Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta's Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta’s Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta's Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

Arahant Upagutta’s Prayer Ceremony at Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple, Penang on Sunday, 4th December, 2016.

 

Prayers to the Moon Goddess   4 comments


Prayers to the Moon Goddess

On a moonless Mid-Autumn Festival or Mooncake Festival Night on Thursday, September 15, 2016 by the Wayang Chinese Opera Troupe from Thailand, the Prayers to the Moon Goddess began with the lighting of the joss sticks.

SP Lim

 

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

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Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Prayers to the Moon Goddess

Mid-Autumn Festival

The festival is intricately linked to legends of Chang E, the mythical Moon Goddess of Immortality. According to “Li-Ji”, an ancient Chinese book recording customs and ceremonies, the Chinese Emperor should offer sacrifices to the sun in spring and the moon in autumn. The 15th day of the 8th lunar month is the day called “Mid-Autumn”. The night on the 15th of the 8th lunar month is also called “Night of the Moon”. Under the Song Dynasty (420), the day was officially declared the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Because of its central role in the Mid-Autumn festival, mooncakes remained popular even in recent years. For many, they form a central part of the Mid-Autumn festival experience such that it is now commonly known as ‘Mooncake Festival’.

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim

Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ~ Part 2   2 comments


Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~
Part 2

The Prayers Session before the mini procession to the main road to burn the Tai Soo Yah image and the Joss Paper Boat.

Sian Chye Tong's Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~ Part 2

Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~
Part 2

 

Sian Chye Tong's Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~ Part 2

Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~
Part 2

Sian Chye Tong's Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~ Part 2

Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~
Part 2

Sian Chye Tong's Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~ Part 2

Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~
Part 2

Sian Chye Tong's Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~ Part 2

Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~
Part 2

Sian Chye Tong's Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~ Part 2

Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~
Part 2

Sian Chye Tong's Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~ Part 2

Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~
Part 2

 

Sian Chye Tong’s Annual Filial Piety Celebration during the Hungry Ghost Festival ending on Saturday, 27 August, 2016 ~
Part 2

The Wesak Day Procession 2016 on Saturday 21.05.2016 with Photographs by Max Teoh Yeam Chuan ~ Part 4   2 comments


The Wesak Day Procession 2016 on Saturday 21.05.2016 with Photographs by Max Teoh Yeam Chuan ~ Part 4

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From Wikipedia.
Wesak or Vesak

Vesākha (Pali; Sanskrit: Vaiśākha), also known as Buddha Purnima and Buddha Day, is a holiday observed traditionally by Buddhists on different days in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Tibet, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia and Myanmar and in other places all over the world. Sometimes informally called “Buddha’s Birthday”, it actually commemorates the birth, enlightenment (nirvāna), and death (Parinirvāna) of Gautama Buddha in the Theravada or southern tradition.

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History

The decision to agree to celebrate Vesākha as the Buddha’s birthday was formalized at the first conference of the World Fellowship of Buddhists held in Sri Lanka in 1950, although festivals at this time in the Buddhist world are a centuries-old tradition. The resolution that was adopted at the World Conference reads as follows:

That this Conference of the World Fellowship of Buddhists, while recording its appreciation of the gracious act of His Majesty, the Maharaja of Nepal in making the full-moon day of Vesak a Public Holiday in Nepal, earnestly requests the Heads of Governments of all countries in which large or small number of Buddhists are to be found, to take steps to make the full-moon day in the month of May a Public Holiday in honour of the Buddha, who is universally acclaimed as one of the greatest benefactors of Humanity.

On Vesākha Day, Buddhists all over the world commemorate events of significance to Buddhists of all traditions: The birth, enlightenment and the passing away of Gautama Buddha. As Buddhism spread from India it was assimilated into many foreign cultures, and consequently Vesākha is celebrated in many different ways all over the world. In India, Vaishakh Purnima day is also known as Buddha Jayanti day and has been traditionally accepted as Buddha’s birth day.

In 1999, the United Nations resolved to internationally observe the day of Vesak at its headquarters and offices.
The name of the observance is derived from the Pali term vesākha or Sanskrit vaiśākha, which is the name of the lunar month in the Hindu calendar falling in April–May (see Vaisakha). In Mahayana Buddhist traditions, the holiday is known by its Sanskrit name (Vaiśākha) and derived variants of it. Local renditions of the name vary by language, including:

Assamese: বুদ্ধ পূর্ণিমা Buddho Purnima
Bengali: বুদ্ধ পূর্ণিমা Buddho Purnima, বুদ্ধ জয়ন্তী Buddho Joyonti, ভেসাক Bhesak
Dzongkha: སྟོན་པའི་དུས་ཆེན་༥ འཛོམས་ Dhüchen Nga Zom
Burmese: ကဆုန်လပြည့် ဗုဒ္ဓနေ့ “Full Moon Day”
Chinese: 佛陀誕辰紀念日; pinyin: Fótuó dànchén jìniàn rì, 佛誕 (Fódàn, Birthday of the Buddha), 浴佛節 (Yùfójié, Occasion of Bathing the Buddha), 衛塞節 (Wèisāi jié)
Hindi: बुद्ध पूर्णिमा Buddha Pūrṇimā, बुद्ध जयन्ती Buddha Jayantī, वैशाख पूर्णिमा Vaisākh Pūrṇimā
Indonesian: Hari Raya Waisak
Japanese: 花祭 Hanamatsuri (Day of Flowers)
Khmer: វិសាខបូជា Visak Bochea
Kannada: ಬುದ್ಧ ಪೌರ್ಣಮಿ Buddha Pournami
Hangul: 석가 탄신일; hanja: 釋迦誕辰日; RR: Seokka Tanshin-il (Birthday of the Shakyamuni Buddha)
Lao: ວິສາຂະບູຊາ Vixakha Bouxa
Malay: Hari Wesak (هاري ويسق)
Mongolian: Бурхан Багшийн Их Дүйцэн Өдөр (Lord Buddha’s Great Festival Day)
Newar: स्वांया पुन्हि Swānyā Punhi
Nepali: बुद्ध पुर्णिमा Buddha Purnima, बुद्ध जयन्ति Buddha Jayanti
Sinhalese: වෙසක් Vesak
Tamil: விசாக தினம் Vicāka Tiṉam
Telugu: బుద్ధ పౌర్ణమి Buddha Pournami or alternatively Telugu: వైశాఖ పౌర్ణమి Vaisakha Pournami
Thai: วิสาขบูชา Wisakha Bucha
Tibetan: ས་ག་ཟླ་བ།, THL: Sa Ga Dawa
Vietnamese: Phật Đản (Birthday of the Buddha)

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim.

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Lim Si Seang Kooi Tong, Penang ~ Part 1   Leave a comment


Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Lim Si Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

From Wikipedia:

Mazu (Goddess)

Mazu (traditional Chinese: 媽祖; simplified Chinese: 妈祖), also spelt Matsu and Ma-tsu, is the Chinese patron goddess who is said to protect seafarers, such as fishermen and sailors. The worship of Mazu began in the Song dynasty. Mazu is widely worshiped in the coastal regions of China, especially in Zhejiang, Fujian, Guangdong, Tianjin and Hainan. She is also worshiped in Taiwan and other places in East/Southeast Asia.
Her birthplace was Meizhou (湄州) in Putian County (莆田縣), Fujian Province. She was born in the year 960. Her family had the surname Lin (林). She had the name Lin Moniang (Chinese: 林默娘). She died on 4 October 987. After her death, she was remembered as a young lady in a red dress, who would forever roam over the seas.

Mazu's Birthday Celebration at Lim Si Seang Kooi Tong as Mazu is the Patron Goddess of the Surname Lim Clan.

Mazu’s Birthday Celebration at Lim Si Seang Kooi Tong as Mazu is the Patron Goddess of the Surname Lim Clan.

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

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Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

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Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

Mazu Birthday Celebrations at Seang Kooi Tong Lim Kongsi, Penang ~ Part 1

I am re-uploading all these smaller-sized photographs above due to my internet problem as I have mistakenly re-programme my Picasa settings. Apologies, folks. Latest, cannot reload as only photograph can be done while the rest – “HTTP Error”. So, the post remained as it is.

SP Lim

Photo 101 : Day Five: Solitude & the “Rule of Thirds”   4 comments


Day Five: Solitude & the “Rule of Thirds”

Solitude – The Nyonya’s Prayers.

In olden days, young unmarried nyonyas were only allowed outside the house except for the Chap Goh Meh during Chinese New Year. This is known as the Chinese’s Valentine Day/Night. Solitude and loneliness are thus part of their daily routine. It is the usual tradition for these unmarried nyonyas to throw mandarin oranges to wish for a good husbands in future.

The photograph which I had captioned as ” The Nyonya’s Prayers “ is an optimistic young unmarried Nyonya praying the Jade Emperor of Heaven to grant her wish of a good loving husband soon to end her life of solitude and loneliness. The “Rule of Thirds” is closely followed with the caption added to the photograph.

SP Lim

The internet in our area (Penang, Malaysia) is extremely slow and was lucky to get this portion uploaded. Hopefully it is not related to my complaints in my recent blogs. Please excuse me that I am not able to read the over 100 emails to see your blogs which I am following for the last few days. I shall read in the next few days if the local internet speed permits me to do so. Sorry, again my fellow friends and bloggers.

The Prayers for a good husband

The Nyonya’s Prayers. In olden days, young unmarried nyonyas were only allowed outside the house except for the Chap Goh Meh during Chinese New Year. This is known as the Chinese’s Valentine Day/Night. Solitude and loneliness are thus part of their daily routine.

From Wikipedia:-

Peranakan Chinese or Straits-born Chinese are the descendants of Chinese immigrants who came to the Malay archipelago including British Malaya (now Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore, where they are also referred to as Baba-Nyonya) and Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia; where they’re also referred as Kiau-Seng) between the 15th and 17th centuries.

Members of this community in Malaysia address themselves as “Baba Nyonya”. Nyonya is the term for the women and Baba for the men. It applies especially to the Han populations of the British Straits Settlements of Malaya and the Dutch-controlled island of Java and other locations, who have adopted Nusantara customs — partially or in full — to be somewhat assimilated into the local communities. Many were the elites of Singapore, more loyal to the British than to China. Most have lived for generations along the straits of Malacca. They were usually traders, the middleman of the British and the Chinese, or the Chinese and Malays, or vice versa because they were mostly English educated. Because of this, they almost always had the ability to speak two or more languages.

While the term Peranakan is most commonly used to refer to those of Chinese descent also known as Straits Chinese (named after the Straits Settlements; 土生華人 in Chinese; Tionghoa-Selat or Tionghoa Peranakan in Indonesian; Phuket Baba among Thais in Phuket, Thailand), there are also other, comparatively smaller Peranakan communities, such as Indian Hindu Peranakans (Chitty), Arab/Indian Muslim Peranakans (Jawi Pekan) (Jawi being the Javanised Arabic script, Pekan a colloquial contraction of Peranakan) and Eurasian Peranakans (Kristang) (Kristang = Christians of Portuguese and Asian ancestry). The group has parallels to the Cambodian Hokkien, who are descendants of Hoklo Chinese, and the Pashu of Myanmar, a Burmese word for the Peranakan or Straits Chinese who have settled in Myanmar. They maintained their culture partially despite their native language gradually disappearing a few generations after settlement.

Blogging U.

For My Future Reference:-

Day Five: Solitude & the “Rule of Thirds”

We’re excited about today’s theme, solitude. In addition to thinking about what it means to you, also consider the placement of the subject in your shot. How can you interpret the state of being alone, or a lonely and uninhabited place?

Find inspiration in this shot of Lanikai Beach in Oahu, Hawaii, as a girl sits in the sand.

Photo – not included

Today’s Tip: As you frame your shot, consider the “Rule of Thirds,” which is a great introductory lesson in composition. Divide your shot into thirds, both horizontally and vertically, so you get nine parts. Your camera probably has the option to display this grid in your viewfinder or LCD screen. But if not, envision this atop your frame:

Rule of Thirds

Place your subject at the intersections of these lines, or along them. In the beach shot, the placement of the girl, toward the bottom-right, doesn’t exactly follow this “rule,” but uses the grid as a guide to create an interesting composition — her aloneness is amplified by the open space to the left. This off-center placement also aligns with how our eyes naturally interact with images.

Get inspired by the submissions from Jen Hooks’ Rule of Thirds photo challenge from February 2015.

Rules are meant to be bent and broken, especially since each image is different! Today, experiment with this grid as you frame your solitary subject.

Cheers,

Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team