Archive for the ‘Sea’ Tag

From George Town to Butterworth on board the ferry at sunset   Leave a comment


From George Town to Butterworth on board the ferry at sunset

From George Town to Butterworth on board the ferry at sunset

From George Town to Butterworth on board the ferry at sunset

From George Town to Butterworth on board the ferry at sunset

From George Town to Butterworth on board the ferry at sunset

From George Town to Butterworth on board the ferry at sunset

From George Town to Butterworth on board the ferry at sunset

The off-shore islands   Leave a comment


The off-shore islands

The off-shore islands in the late afternoon

The off-shore islands at dusk

From my Photo Archives ~ X   Leave a comment


From my Photo Archives ~ X

Dear fellow Relatives, Bloggers, Friends, Associates and All.

Thank for your patience and tolerance as finally my internet is back for a while. I am using this window of opportunity to upload my photographs from my archives first. Apologies.

SP Lim

The Ship in the Harbour

From my Photo Archives ~ IX   Leave a comment


From my Photo Archives ~ IX

Dear fellow Relatives, Bloggers, Friends, Associates and All.

Thank for your patience and tolerance as finally my internet is back for a while. I am using this window of opportunity to upload my photographs from my archives first. Apologies.

SP Lim

Low tide

Developing Your Eye II, Day Eight: “Edge”   2 comments


Developing Your Eye II, Day Eight: “Edge”

My submission is the ” Sunrise at Penang Port ” for the theme “Edge” – Straighten Your Image. There are many straight lines to be straightened so I can only straighten the biggest mast of the yacht only – perfectly straight. Done.

SP Lim

 

Developing Your Eye II, Day Seven: “Edge”

Developing Your Eye II, Day Seven: “Edge”


Developing Your Eye II, Day Eight: “Edge”

Day Eight: “Edge” — Straighten Your Image

  • At Ta Prohm, the jungle temple in the Angkor Wat complex in Cambodia, centuries-old carvings have fallen victim to time and tree roots. In some areas, walls still stand, their intact windows creating frames and portals. The solid, straight edges of the windows are a stark contrast to the stones that have tumbled down over time.
    Developing Your Eye II, Day Eight: “Edge” ~ Straighten Your Image

    Developing Your Eye II, Day Eight: “Edge” ~ Straighten Your Image

     

    Today, show us an edge — a straight line, a narrow ridge, a precipice.

    Today’s Tip: Use an editing tool to check the alignment and adjust the image so that your edge is perfectly straight.

    Visit the resource page for straightening tips. Remember to tag your post with#developingyoureye and check the Reader to see posts from fellow course participants!

    Publish a new post

    Cheers,
    Cheri and the WordPress.com Team

    ************************************************************************************************************************************

From the Vietnamese Fishing Village   Leave a comment


From the Vietnamese Fishing Village

I managed to capture this landscape photograph from the higher embankment from the beach of this large fishing village at sunset.

SP Lim

From the Vietnamese Fishing Village

From the Vietnamese Fishing Village

Going out to sea   Leave a comment


Going out to sea
This is a coracle going out to sea with three boatmen in Vietnam.

SP Lim
From Wikipedia:-
The coracle is a small, lightweight boat of the sort traditionally used in Wales but also in parts of Western and South West England, Ireland (particularly the River Boyne), and Scotland (particularly the River Spey); the word is also used of similar boats found in India, Vietnam, Iraq and Tibet. The word “coracle” comes from the Welsh cwrwgl, cognate with Irish and Scottish Gaelic currach, and is recorded in English as early as the sixteenth century. Other historical English spellings include corougle, corracle, curricle and coricle.

Structure
Oval in shape and very similar to half a walnut shell, the structure is made of a framework of split and interwoven willow rods, tied with willow bark. The outer layer was originally an animal skin such as horse or bullock hide (corium), with a thin layer of tar to make it fully waterproof – today replaced by tarred calico or canvas, or simply fibreglass. The Vietnamese/Asian version of the coracle is made somewhat differently: using interwoven bamboo and waterproofed by using resin and coconut oil. The structure has a keel-less, flat bottom to evenly spread the weight of the boat and its load across the structure and to reduce the required depth of water – often to only a few inches, making it ideal for use on rivers.

Each coracle is unique in design, as it is tailored to the river conditions where it was built and intended to be used. In general there is one design per river, but this is not always the case. The Teifi coracle, for instance, is flat-bottomed, as it is designed to negotiate shallow rapids, common on the river in the summer, while the Carmarthen coracle is rounder and deeper, because it is used in tidal waters on the Tywi, where there are no rapids. Teifi coracles are made from locally harvested wood – willow for the laths (body of the boat), hazel for the weave (Y bleth in Welsh – the bit round the top) – while Tywi coracles have been made from sawn ash for a long time. The working boats tend to be made from fibreglass these days. Teifi coracles use no nails, relying on the interweaving of the laths for structural coherence, whilst the Carmarthen ones use copper nails and no interweaving.

They are an effective fishing vessel because, when powered by a skilled person, they hardly disturb the water or the fish, and they can be easily manoeuvred with one arm, while the other arm tends to the net; two coracles to a net. The coracle is propelled by means of a broad-bladed paddle, which traditionally varies in design between different rivers. It is used in a sculling action, the blade describing a figure-of-eight pattern in the water. The paddle is used towards the front of the coracle, pulling the boat forward, with the paddler facing in the direction of travel.

Another important aspect to the Welsh Coracle is that it can be carried on his back by one person. ‘Llwyth dyn ei gorwgl’ — the load of a man is his coracle. (Welsh saying).

Posted May 29, 2015 by lspeng1951 in Canon, Photo Expedition, Photo Outing, Photography, Travel

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Blue sky and calm seas   Leave a comment


Blue sky and calm seas even up to Penang First Bridge and Penang Port Cruise Terminal ……

Near the Tan Heritage Jetty   Leave a comment


I was shooting at the embankment near the Tan Heritage Jetty of Weld Quay, Penang before my breakfast this morning of 28 December, 2014. We were planning to go to the “Occupy Beach Street” Event for some photo-shooting. It was low tide at the time and one could easily see the muddy shoreline with Penang channel in the background. Some steamers and boats were seen and in a few photographs you can even see the First Penang Bridge in the faint background. The Penang Bridge connects Penang Mainland to the Penang Island.

SP Lim

A Photographic Society of Penang photo outing at Batu Ferringhi   Leave a comment



An interesting PSP photo outing at Batu Ferringhi was organized this Sunday morning of 17 February, 2013. We woke early at 7.30 am and after the usual morning chores, we are driving up Vale of Temple towards Tanjung Bungah. Stopped at a food stall and had roti canai plus teh tark. We then met the guys at The Ship car park. We had two water scooters demonstrating their “water-splashing” skills to us. At a nominal RM10.00 for members and RM20.00 for non-members we had 45 minutes or more of their water scootering skills for photo shooting. It was cloudy and the sky did not brighten up until we were packing and going back. Anyway, these are some shots for the morning shoot.

SP Lim

Let us rise up and be thankful, for if we didn’t learn a lot today, at least we learned a little, and if we didn’t learn a little, at least we didn’t get sick, and if we got sick, at least we didn’t die; so, let us all be thankful.
By Buddha

Every writer I know has trouble writing. — Joseph Heller

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