Archive for the ‘Thai Buddhist Temple’ Tag

Photo 101 ~ Day Twelve : Architecture & Monochrome ~ The Thai Wat in Vietnam   16 comments


Photo 101
Day Twelve: Architecture & Monochrome ~ The Thai Wat in Vietnam

Vietnamese Thai Wat

This is a Thai Wat or Buddhist Temple in Vietnam near Ho Chi Minh City.

This is a Thai Wat or Buddhist Temple in Vietnam near Ho Chi Minh City in monochrome. I had the opportunity of taking the photograph but did not actually centralize the framing properly. We were given less than an hour to take photographs here as we were travelling quite a distance to another town.

The Thai Wat

This is another colour version of a Thai Wat or Buddhist Temple in Vietnam near Ho Chi Minh City.

This is another colour version of a Thai Wat or Buddhist Temple in Vietnam near Ho Chi Minh City. I had the opportunity of taking the photograph but did not actually align the framing properly. We were given less than an hour to take photographs here as we were travelling quite a distance to another town. Hopefully, I shall get another chance in future to shoot this uniquely designed Thai Buddhist Temple slowly and not in a rush.

SP Lim

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Photo 101

Day Twelve: Architecture & Monochrome

From geometric patterns on skyscrapers to the ironwork on historical buildings, there are many opportunities to capture the beauty and complexity of architecture.

Consider this intricate, organic “doorway” of La Pedrera, a famous building by architect Antoni Gaudí in Barcelona, Spain:

Photo – not included

Perhaps there’s a grand spiral stairwell at your favorite museum. A stunning Art Deco movie theater in your town. Or a futuristic micro-house on your block. How will you interpret this theme?

Today’s Tip: As we explored yesterday, color is a powerful element in photography. But let’s not forget black and white, or monochrome, which can be very dramatic! Black, white, gray, and shades in between interact in the frame in dynamic ways.

When we talk about monochrome in photography, we’re referring to images developed or executed in black and white or in varying tones of only one color.

Train your eye to look for architectural elements that translate in black and white: sharp lines and patterns, defined shapes, large surface areas, and a mix of very light and very dark colors. Compare the color and monochrome versions of today’s shot:

WPC Monochrome

The lines, shapes, and surfaces within the frame come alive in both versions in different ways.

If you’ve never gone monochrome, many devices let you switch to black and white shooting mode right in the camera. Or, shoot in color and convert your images to black and white (or grayscale) after in Photoshop or a free image editor like PicMonkey, GIMP, or Pixlr.

Cheers,
Josh R. and the WordPress.com Team

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The Thai Buddhist Temple in Vietnam in landscape format   Leave a comment


The Thai Buddhist Temple in Vietnam

This is a Thai Wat or Buddhist Temple in Vietnam near Ho Chi Minh City in monochrome. I had the opportunity of taking the photograph but did not actually centralize the framing properly. We were given less than an hour to take photographs here as we were travelling quite a distance to another town.

SP Lim

<strong>The Thai Buddhist Temple in Vietnam</strong>

The Thai Buddhist Temple in Vietnam

The Thai Buddhist Temple in Vietnam   Leave a comment


The Thai Buddhist Temple in Vietnam

This is a Thai Wat or Buddhist Temple in Vietnam near Ho Chi Minh City in monochrome. I had the opportunity of taking the photograph but did not actually centralize the framing properly. We were given less than an hour to take photographs here as we were travelling quite a distance to another town.

SP Lim

Vietnam Photo Expedition 5D CF Part 1 333

The Thai Buddhist Temple in Vietnam …   1 comment


The Thai Buddhist Temple in Vietnam …

Prayers for my Grandfather, Granduncle and my late Wife during Teong Guan Chek   Leave a comment


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This morning was the day I shall pray to my Grandfather, Granduncle ( elder brother of my Grandpa ) and mt late Wife at the Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple, Burmah Lane, Penang for the Teong Guan Chek which is also crudely called the Hunbgry Ghosts’ Festival.

SP Lim

Proofread carefully to see if you any words out. — Author Unknown

My Grandfather’s Story Part 2   1 comment


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Where was I yesterday – which part of the story I had left off? Ohh… the “picking the gold” ceremony, so the next question is “what is this ceremony all about” from an uninitiated. This is a religious Taoist-originated ritual where one can dig the grave of a dearly departed and “transfer” the remains to another location. In our case, the ritual will involve basically about 6 steps. Firstly, seek the correct undertaker to do the task properly followed by making an official Police report of the purpose of digging up the grave and transfer of remains to another location. Thirdly, the ceremony proper with prayers before the actual digging starts and then the “picking of the gold” that is the actual act of picking of the remains of the skeleton. The remains are then placed into a small coffin with usual joss papers and it is to be transported to the crematorium for cremation. Putting the cremated remains into a urn and the carrying of the urn to the location in Penang, in our case at Wat Chaiyamangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple. These urns are to be put into the niches and on a selected day, a black merble plaque shall be placed over these niches.
During the Qing Ming or Cheng Beng, I collected two telephone contacts and passed to my mother. She contacted a funeral contractor or undertaker by the name of Ah Lam. From there, the “project” got under way and then within a period of 1 month or so, the cycle of events described above of the “Picking the Gold” ceremony was successfully completed.
On 9th of May, 2012 my mother, Mdm Tea Siew Yam and myself set out to Sungai Patani or Petani main town centre. There, we met up with Ah Lam for the main purpose of making a Police Report about the intention of digging up the two graves of my grandfather and granduncle.My mother made the Police Report and we went over to the Sungai Petani Chinese Association which manages the graveyard. A monetary deposit of RM2,000.00 per grave is to be made to ensure that after the digging of these graves, the area is levelled and kept clean of any cement remnants of the pre-existing graves.The actual cost agreed with the undertaker was at RM4,000.00 per deceased thus making a total cost of RM8,000.00 for the two graves. After making the cash deposits with the Association we drove to the Sungai Patani Thai Buddhist Temple to purchase two yellow porcelain urns from Thailand to store the remains and ashes of our Grandfather and Granduncle after the anticipated cremation. After the paperwork and purchase of the urns were completed, we left for Penang and went straight to Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple. This is the time to purchase the niches for two of the deceased. The cost was RM4,500.00 per niche and it reminded me sadly of the task when I had to purchase for my dear departed wife in 2010. I did purchase one niche for myself too and my Grandfather’s niche shall be directly above mine.

To be continued to Part 3
Photographs tomorrow are NOT for the faint-hearted. Be forewarned.

SP Lim

I do not like to write – I like to have written. — Gloria Steinem

The Thai Wat or Buddhist Temple in Shantou, China   Leave a comment


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This Thai Buddhist Temple or rather a Buddhist Temple in Thai architecture was built is Shantou by a prominent Thai overseas Chinese.

From Wikipedia
Shantou (simplified Chinese: 汕头; traditional Chinese: 汕頭; pinyin: Shàntóu; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Sòaⁿ-thâu), historically known as Swatow or Suátao, is a prefecture-level city on the eastern coast of Guangdong province, People’s Republic of China, with a total population of 5,391,028 as of 2010 and an administrative area of 2,064 square kilometres (797 sq mi). With it and the immediately surrounding cities of Jieyang and Chaozhou, the metropolitan region – known as Chaoshan – covers an area of 10,404 square kilometres (4,017 sq mi), and had a permanent population of 13,937,897 at the end of 2010.

Shantou, a city significant in 19th-century Chinese history as one of the treaty ports established for Western trade and contact, was one of the original Special Economic Zones of the People’s Republic of China established in the 1980s, but failed to blossom like other cities such as Shenzhen, Xiamen and Zhuhai. However, it remains as Eastern Guangdong’s economic centre, and is home to Shantou University, a member of the “Project 211” group.

SP Lim

Celebrations at Wat Pin Bang Onn, Green Lane, Penang on Sunday, March 20, 2011   Leave a comment


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