Archive for the ‘Twa Peh Kong’ Tag

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner ~ 3.3   Leave a comment


Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner ~ 3.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

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Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner ~ 2.3   2 comments


Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner ~ 2.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Dinner on Sunday,

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 3.3   Leave a comment


Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 3.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 3.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 3.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 3.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 3.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 3.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 3.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 2.3   Leave a comment


Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 2.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 2.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 2.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 2.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 2.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 2.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 2.3

 

 

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 1.3   Leave a comment


Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 1.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 1.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 1.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 1.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 1.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 1.3

Poh Hock Seah’s Twa Peh Kong Birthday Celebrations 1.3

Twa Peh Kong’s Teochew Wayang starts   Leave a comment


Twa Peh Kong’s Teochew Wayang starts

Our part of the Malaysia was badly hit by heavy rainfall a week ago with many low-lying places flooded. My house was unaffected as it is on slightly higher level. However, rain continued to fall on and off – sometimes heavy rains causing a lot of tension and anxiety.

So, last night of Friday, 22 September, 2017 I wrote on Facebook … ” Rain stopped for some time, so maybe go photo-shooting tonight … ” of which I did but quite late at 9.30 pm breaking the monotony of just staying at home and watching TV.

SP Lim

Twa Peh Kong’s Teochew Wayang starts

Twa Peh Kong’s Teochew Wayang starts

Twa Peh Kong’s Teochew Wayang starts

Twa Peh Kong’s Teochew Wayang starts

Twa Peh Kong’s Teochew Wayang starts

Twa Peh Kong’s Teochew Wayang starts

 

I was told and heard from the Manager of this leading Thai-originated Teochew Sai Yong Hong Wayang Troupe personally that it  shall be performing for the last year in Penang due to economical reason/s. Owing to the low exchange rate of Malaysian Ringgit (RM) to Thailand’s Baht, it is grossly unprofitable to come to Penang to perform even at a higher rate of RM5,000.00 per night’s performance. It is furthermore more profitable to perform in Thailand as the Thai richer Wayang fans will give generous amount of cash to outstanding performers during the performance itself. As the Malaysian audience are usually wage-earners, such cash rewards were practically non-existent locally.

So what you are seeing of these photographs shall be the final few photographs of their performances in Penang as I shall try to catch more moments of their final performances in Penang.

SP Lim

Wednesday, 20.09.2017 ~ First Day of the 8th Moon – The month of Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival   Leave a comment


Today – Wednesday, 20 September, 2017 ~ is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

SP Lim

From Wikipedia:-

Mid-Autumn Festival

The festival is intricately linked to legends of Chang E, the mythical Moon Goddess of Immortality. According to the Liji, an ancient Chinese book recording customs and ceremonies, the Chinese Emperor should offer sacrifices to the sun in spring and the moon in autumn. The 15th day of the 8th lunar month is the day called “Mid-Autumn”. The night on the 15th of the 8th lunar month is also called “Night of the Moon”. Under the Song Dynasty (420), the day was officially declared the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Because of its central role in the Mid-Autumn festival, mooncakes remained popular even in recent years. For many, they form a central part of the Mid-Autumn festival experience such that it is now commonly known as ‘Mooncake Festival’.

 

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

Today is the First Day of the 8th Moon – Twa Peh Kong’s Birthdays and Mooncake Festival thus the second round of Wayang Photo-shooting.

mooncake (simplified Chinese月饼traditional Chinese月餅pinyinyuè bĭngJyutpingjyut6 beng2Yaleyuht béng) is a Chinese bakery product traditionally eaten during the Mid-Autumn Festival (中秋節). The festival is for lunar appreciation and moon watching, when mooncakes are regarded as an indispensable delicacy. Mooncakes are offered between friends or on family gatherings while celebrating the festival. The Mid-Autumn Festival is one of the four most important Chinese festivals.

Typical mooncakes are round pastries, measuring about 10 cm in diameter and 3–4 cm thick. This is the Cantonese mooncake, eaten in Southern China in GuangdongHong Kong, and Macau. A rich thick filling usually made from red bean or lotus seed paste is surrounded by a thin (2–3 mm) crust and may contain yolks from salted duck eggs. Mooncakes are usually eaten in small wedges accompanied by tea. Today, it is customary for businessmen and families to present them to their clients or relatives as presents, helping to fuel a demand for high-end mooncakes. A considerable amount of waste is also produced. According to the Wall Street Journal’s China edition, as many as two million mooncakes are thrown away each year in Hong Kong alone, not to mention the often voluminous packaging.

Due to China’s influence, mooncakes and Mid-Autumn Festival are also enjoyed and celebrated in other parts of Asia. Mooncakes have also appeared in western countries as a form of delicacy.

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