Archive for the ‘Wat Chaiya Mangalaram’ Tag

Cheng Beng ( Session 2 ) on Thursday, 28th March, 2019 to Beow Heong Lim Temple, Ayer Itam, Penang to pray to my paternal Grandmother, my maternal Grandfather & Grandmother and my late Father.   Leave a comment


 

Cheng Beng Session 2 on Thursday, 28th March, 2019 to Beow Heong Lim Temple, Ayer Itam, Penang to pray to my paternal Grandmother, my maternal Grandfather & Grandmother and my late Father.

 

The Qingming or Ching Ming festival, also known as Tomb-Sweeping Day in English (sometimes also called Chinese Memorial Day or Ancestors’ Day), is a traditional Chinese festival observed by the Han Chinese and the Chitty of Indonesia,Malaysia and Singapore. It falls on the first day of the fifth solar term of the traditional Chinese  lunar isolar calendar. This makes it the 15th day after the Spring Equinox, either 4 or 5 April in a given year. During Qingming, Chinese families visit the tombs of their ancestors to clean the gravesites, pray to their ancestors, and make ritual offerings. Offerings would typically include traditional food dishes, and the burning of joss sticks and joss paper. The holiday recognizes the traditional reverence of one’s ancestors in Chinese culture.

The Qingming Festival has been observed by the Chinese for over 2500 years. It became a public holiday in mainland China in 2008. In Taiwan, the public holiday was in the past observed on 5 April to honor the death of Chiang Kai-shek on that day in 1975, but with Chiang’s popularity waning, this convention is not being observed. A similar holiday is observed in the Ryukyu Islands, called Shīmī in the local language.

In mainland China, the holiday is associated with the consumption of qingtuan, green dumplings made of glutinous riceand Chinese mugwort or barley grass. A similar confection called caozaiguo or shuchuguo, made with Jersey cudweed, is consumed in Taiwan.

 

Cheng Beng on Thursday, 28th March, 2019 to my Grandfather, Granduncle, and my late wife at Wat Chaiya Manggalaram, Pulau Tikus, Penang   Leave a comment


Cheng Beng on Thursday, 28th March, 2019 to my Grandfather, Granduncle, and my late wife at Wat Chaiya Manggalaram, Pulau Tikus, Penang

The Qingming or Ching Ming festival, also known as Tomb-Sweeping Day in English (sometimes also called Chinese Memorial Day or Ancestors’ Day),[2][3] is a traditional Chinese festival observed by the Han Chinese and the Chitty of Indonesia,Malaysia and Singapore. It falls on the first day of the fifth solar term of the traditional Chinese lunisolarcalendar. This makes it the 15th day after the Spring Equinox, either 4 or 5 April in a given year.[4][5][6] During Qingming, Chinese families visit the tombs of their ancestors to clean the gravesites, pray to their ancestors, and make ritual offerings. Offerings would typically include traditional food dishes, and the burning of joss sticks and joss paper. The holiday recognizes the traditional reverence of one’s ancestors in Chinese culture.

The Qingming Festival has been observed by the Chinese for over 2500 years. It became a public holiday in mainland China in 2008. In Taiwan, the public holiday was in the past observed on 5 April to honor the death of Chiang Kai-shek on that day in 1975, but with Chiang’s popularity waning, this convention is not being observed. A similar holiday is observed in the Ryukyu Islands, called Shīmī in the local language.

In mainland China, the holiday is associated with the consumption of qingtuan, green dumplings made of glutinous riceand Chinese mugwort or barley grass. A similar confection called caozaiguo or shuchuguo, made with Jersey cudweed, is consumed in Taiwan.

 

Cheng Beng for my late wife   4 comments


Cheng Beng

Niche of my paternal Grandfather, the late Lim Chong Poh who passed away in th 1930’s thus no photograph as yet until I find one.

Cheng Beng for my late wife

We had a Cheng Beng prayers for my late wife, Saw Ai, my paternal grandfather – Lim Chong Poh and grand-uncle – Lim Chong Pin, at the niches of Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple, Burmah Lane, Penang. my future niche for my ashes is there beside my wife when I “kick the bucket” (pass away) in future. Life is uncertain but death is certain, as the Buddha said. We chose a week day ie Wednesday, March 30, 2016 as there shall be lesser devotees.

The prayers went smoothly with my mother and family members; and ended with burning of joss papers – a old traditional Taoist practice that is difficult to forego even as Buddhists.

SP Lim

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Cheng Beng

Our 2016 Cheng Beng or Tomb Sweeping Prayers to my late Wife, Grandfather and grand-uncle in Penang.


I have to upload this post first as my internet is extremely slow and unstable.

SP Lim
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Simple Prayers for my late wife   Leave a comment


1-ASA 100YearsLadyDana 008A simple prayers’ ceremony for my late wife – Ang Saw Ai on the 10th Day of the Chinese 10th Moon (corresponding to Saturday, November 21, 2015) – five years had swiftly passed. My simple offering of her favourite food and drink of the Hainanese Chicken Rice and local black coffee without sugar.

“When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices.
When you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.”

SP Lim

PS I am back again after an “unusual suspension” of 48 hours of no internet. Thus no posting.

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Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple with the Reclining Buddha in Penang   1 comment


Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple with the Reclining Buddha in Penang

Pulau Tikus and not depicted as Tikus Island in Wikipedia
Though the translation of Pulau Tikus is correct but the local residents do not use this name of Tikus Island at all. Some wise guy had put this up at Wikipedia which is wrong and objectionable.
“There are also numerous Buddhist and Taoist temples, with the more famous ones being the Wat Chaiya Mangalaram ( Reclining Buddha Temple ) built in Burma Line in 1845, the 203-year-old Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple just opposite, and the Buppharam Buddhist Temple in Perak Road.”

Inser6ted by SP Lim

Cheng Beng Prayers at Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple, Penang   Leave a comment


Cheng Beng Prayers at Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple, Penang.

Final duty of burning the joss paper and “gifts”.

From Wikipedia:-
Ancestor veneration (Chinese: 敬祖; pinyin: jìngzǔ) in Chinese culture and ethnic religion is the practice of living family members and Chinese kins to pay honour and respect (Chinese: 拜拜; pinyin: bàibài) to their progenitors and ancestors. Emphasised in Confucian philosophy, paying respect to one’s ancestors is an aspect of filial piety (Chinese: 孝; pinyin: xiào) and is deeply rooted in Chinese culture; it is believed that the relationship and obligations of children toward their parents remains intact even after death.
Each Chinese kin maintains its own network of ancestral temples, where the godly progenitors and other ancestors of the lineage are worshipped. At these temples, ceremonies can be performed either by elders of the lineage, Taoist clergy, or, more rarely, Buddhist monks. Thus, rituals for ancestral worship are found in the practices of both Taoism and Chinese Buddhism.

Continued obeisance
After the funeral, families often install an ancestral tablet at a household altar alongside other deceased ancestors. This act symbolically unifies the ancestors and honors the family lineage. Incense is lit before the altar daily, significant announcements are made before them, and offerings such as favorite foods, beverages, and spirit money are given bi-monthly and on special occasions, such as Qingming Festival (or Cheng Beng in Hokkien in my blog) and Ghost Festival.
Prayer was usually performed at the household altar in a separate room containing the po of their ancestors. The eldest male would speak to the altar on a regular basis. In some belief systems where special powers are ascribed to the deceased, he may supplicate the spirit to bless the family.

SP Lim

Crystallized Naga’s at Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple, Penang   Leave a comment


The Naga’s or Thai Dragons at Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple in Penang, are being upgraded with mirror-like crystal tiles from Belgium.

SP Lim

Simple Prayer Ceremony in memory of my late wife   Leave a comment


Simple Prayer Ceremony in memory of my late wife Time flies and on this Monday, 1st December, 2014 corresponded to the Chinese 10th Day of the 10th Moon. This Chinese Lunar Calendar date was the Anniversary date of the passing away of my late wife, Ang Saw Ai in 2010. Thus, this was the Fourth Anniversary of her untimely demise.
A simple prayer ceremony was conducted by offering her favourite wanton mee and her black coffee at the niche at Wat Chaiya Mangalaram Thai Buddhist Temple, Penang. Sadhu, sadhu, sadhu.

SP Lim

“Even death is not to be feared by one who has lived wisely.”- Buddha

Thai Songkran Festival and Burmese Water Festival 2014 in Penang, Malaysia   Leave a comment


I came back home wet but my camera is still all right even with a few wet encounters from the Thai Songkran Festival and Burmese Water Festival 2014 which are happening now at Thai Chaiya Mangalaram Buddhist Temple and Dhammikarama Burmese Buddhist Temple at Burma Lane. However, we need to remember to conserve water too in this joy of celebrations as Malaysia is experiencing the worst in 15 years. Even part of the wettest town in Malaysia, Taiping also faced water rationing. Water rationing had started in Selangor and Negri Sembilan states. However, Penang with the multi-religious, multi-cultural, multi-ethnic background has overcome such problem quite easily. It started to rain quite consistently these few weeks. It pays to pray!

SP Lim

Chinese New Year Prayers for the dearly departed   Leave a comment


With the approaching Chinese New Year in two days’ time, we still remember the dearly departed – my late wife, grandfather and granduncle whom I never met, with simple prayers in memory … Sadhu, sadhu, sadhu.

SP Lim

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