Archive for the ‘Xiamen’ Tag

The Shu Zuang Garden and the Piano Museum of Gulangyu Island   1 comment


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From the Wikipedia:-
As a place of residence for Westerners during Xiamen’s colonial past, Gulangyu is famous for its architecture and for hosting China’s only piano museum, giving it the nickname of “Piano Island” or “The Town of Pianos” (鋼琴之鄉) or “The Island of Music” (音樂之島). There are over 200 pianos on this island.

The Chinese name also has musical roots, as gu lang means drum waves so-called because of the sound generated by the ocean waves hitting the reefs. Yu means “islet”.

In addition, there is a museum dedicated to Koxinga, Haidi Shijie (海底世界) Marine World, a subtropical garden containing plants introduced by overseas Chinese, as well as Xiamen Museum, formerly the Eight Diagrams Tower (八卦樓).

There’s also an Organ museum, bird sanctuary, plant nursery, and a tram that takes to the peak. On the west beach of the island you can rent pedal boats and jet skis. There’s a garden of 12 grottos to represent each of the animals on the zodiac. Built into the hillside, its a maze of caves and tunnels to find all twelve (and the exit). There are many boutique hotels to stay in as well.

The island of Gulangyu is a pedestrian-only destination, where the only vehicles on the islands are several fire trucks and electric tourist buggies. The narrow streets on the island, together with the architecture of various styles around the world, give the island a unique appearance.

Strolling along the Gulangyu Island   Leave a comment


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From the Wikipedia:-
HISTORY
Xiamen (formerly known as Amoy) became a treaty port resulting from China’s loss in the First Opium War and the Treaty of Nanking in 1842, hence the predominantly Victorian-era style architecture throughout Gulangyu Island, where 13 countries including Great Britain, France and Japan established consulates, churches, and hospitals. Gulangyu was officially designated an International Settlement in 1903. Japanese occupation of the island began in 1942, and lasted until the end of World War II. The Amoy dialect of Hokkien is spoken on the island.
TRANSPORTATION
Gulangyu is unique in China as a “Traffic Free Island”. It is connected to the main Xiamen island only by ferry.

Neither cars nor bicycles are allowed, and the peaceful island provides an alternative to the hectic life in Xiamen City across the river, although the recent introduction of electric tourist buggies is felt to be damaging the island’s charm. Freight is pulled on wheeled buggies up the often steep lanes by strong teams of men.

ATTRACTIONS
As a place of residence for Westerners during Xiamen’s colonial past, Gulangyu is famous for its architecture and for hosting China’s only piano museum, giving it the nickname of “Piano Island” or “The Town of Pianos” (鋼琴之鄉) or “The Island of Music” (音樂之島). There are over 200 pianos on this island.

The Chinese name also has musical roots, as gu lang means drum waves so-called because of the sound generated by the ocean waves hitting the reefs. Yu means “islet”.

In addition, there is a museum dedicated to Koxinga, Haidi Shijie (海底世界) Marine World, a subtropical garden containing plants introduced by overseas Chinese, as well as Xiamen Museum, formerly the Eight Diagrams Tower (八卦樓).

There’s also an Organ museum, bird sanctuary, plant nursery, and a tram that takes to the peak. On the west beach of the island you can rent pedal boats and jet skis. There’s a garden of 12 grottos to represent each of the animals on the zodiac. Built into the hillside, its a maze of caves and tunnels to find all twelve (and the exit). There are many boutique hotels to stay in as well.

The island of Gulangyu is a pedestrian only destination, where the only vehicles on the islands are several fire trucks and electric tourist buggies. The narrow streets on the island, together with the architecture of various styles around the world, give the island a unique appearance.

Xiamen’s favourite spot for Wedding Photographers   2 comments


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My Fujian Trip was in the month of September which partially corresponds to the Chinese Lunar Eighth Moon – when Mooncake Festival is celebrated and a good month to get hitched for the Chinese couples even in Penang, Malaysia itself. Actually from Day 2 of the trip, I had taken quite a few Chinese brides and grooms at various locations eg in Hotels, Restauranta and Parks. This wetland park is quite isolated and the number of brides and grooms found here could easily exceed 20 couples or more. Well, wishing many years of blissful and happy marriage ahead for these newly-weds.

SP Lim

HuaQiao or Overseas Chinese Museum, Xiamen, China   1 comment


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This is the HuaQiao ( Overseas Chinese ) Museum founded by the Singaporean philantrophist Tan Kah Kee. An excellent collection of Chinese antiques are kept here within this Museum.
From the Wikipedia:-
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Tan.
Tan Kah Kee (simplified Chinese: 陈嘉庚; traditional Chinese: 陳嘉庚; pinyin: Chén Jiāgēng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Tân Kah-kiⁿ) (October 21, 1874 – August 12, 1961) was a prominent businessman, community leader, and philanthropist in colonial Singapore, and a Communist leader in the People’s Republic of China.

SP Lim

At the Park at Xiamen, China   Leave a comment


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This is a big park by the lake in the middle of Xiamen City, China. I am quite impressed with cleanliness regime of the lake in this park as one can clearly two cleaners in a boat cleaning the rubbish in the lake.

SP Lim

The Concert at Xiamen Part 3   Leave a comment


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This is part 3 of the Cultural Concert which I attended during my Fujian Tour on last September 2011.

SP Lim

The Cultural Concert at Xiamen, China – Part 2   Leave a comment


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This is the second part of the Cultural Concert at Xiamen.

SP Lim

The Cultural Concert from Xiamen Art & Cultural Center, Xiamen, Fujian, China – Part 1   Leave a comment


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This is a series of photographs which I took at the Concert at Xiamen, Fujian, China. I took these photos from a hundred metres or so away without flash using an unsteady tripod. Luckily the photos came out reasonably all right but some were just blurry. By the stroke of luck, I was thrusted a piece of pink paper with the narrations of the cultural performances at the recent Penang Esplanade’s China Cultural Concert 2011. Yes, this is the information which I needed for my photograph series taken at the Cultural Concert in Xiamen during my visit in September 2011. In the haste I am not aware of the name of the venue of the Cultural Concert and the Acts played out at the Xiamen Art and Cultural Concert. Thus, armed with newly dicovered information, I shall explain the concert in finer details.
Act One
There is definitely a symbiotic connection between the ocean and the Min’nan or coastal people from Fujian. Xiamen is itself an island and thus earning a living from the sea is the logical choice. The Act One depicts this intertwine of the essence of the ocean and the Min’nan (Hokkien) culture.
Act 2 is probably about the charming Hui-an Girl and troupe of dancing girls. Well, that reminded my late wife who prided herself as a girl from this region. A thrifty hard-working female worker of untold strength and diligence and that she was, my late wife Saw Ai. Remember those olden days the ladies dress in blue dresses helping the mason, carrying stones, cement and bricks in Penang. These ladies were from Hui-an.
Next Act 3 was the depiction of the fighting monks from Southern Shaolin Temple of China.

SP Lim

The Second Night of the China Cultural Festival at Esplanade on Sunday, 23 October, 2011   Leave a comment


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The weather for Sunday was clear and warm as iit rained at 6.30 pm earlier for half an hour. The show by this Magic Min’nan Art Troupe was good as the one I had seen at the Xiamen Art and Cultural Centre last month. However, the grave disadvantage was the outdoor stage compared to the indoor one with special lightings in Xiamen. One cannot complain much as it is free-of-charge compared to the small fees we had to pay in Xiamen, China.

SP Lim

The intricate stone carvings of Tan Kah Kee Memorial of XIamen ( Part 3 )   Leave a comment


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We were told that these stone carvings or sculptures took ten years to complete. On the left side of the hallway as one walks into the memorial. was the depiction of the history of Mao Tze Tung while on the right was the depiction of the scenes from the Three Kindgdom.

SP Lim

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