Archive for the ‘Natural World’ Category

The Leafless Tree   2 comments


The Leafless Tree

It is definitely better than a Lifeless Tree.

SP Lim

The leafless tree. The Leafless Tree It is definitely better than a Lifeless Tree.

The leafless tree

The lumbering Elephant   Leave a comment


The lumbering Elephant

The lumbering Elephant

The lumbering Elephant

 

The Magnificent Tree   Leave a comment


The Magnificent Tree

A magnificent tree in the clearing

A magnificent tree in the clearing

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp   Leave a comment


Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

After Breakfast at Amara Montain Resort, Kalaw, Myanmar we were headed towards the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp for the day. We had checked out of the hotel as we were heading towards Inle Lake after the Elephant Camp. We had an Indian food lunch at the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp.

SP Lim

(14.11.2016) Day 3:/ Kalaw >> Elephant Camp >> Nyaung Shwe

After Breakfast at your hotel, around 9 am, move to Elephant Camp, see and feel how nature is beautiful and also see how mahout life. Together with mahout, Feeding and bathing elephant, (riding elephant will cost extra charge).

Lunch at Elephant camp After Lunch, move to Inle Lake, Upon your arrival in Nyaung Shwe, move to Hotel on the lake. Overnight in Aureum Palace Resort and Spa.

Lunch and Dinner by Own Account

Extracted from the Official Itinerary.

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.4 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp   Leave a comment


Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

After Breakfast at Amara Montain Resort, Kalaw, Myanmar we were headed towards the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp for the day. We had checked out of the hotel as we were heading towards Inle Lake after the Elephant Camp. We had an Indian food lunch at the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp.

SP Lim

(14.11.2016) Day 3:/ Kalaw >> Elephant Camp >> Nyaung Shwe

After Breakfast at your hotel, around 9 am, move to Elephant Camp, see and feel how nature is beautiful and also see how mahout life. Together with mahout, Feeding and bathing elephant, (riding elephant will cost extra charge).

Lunch at Elephant camp After Lunch, move to Inle Lake, Upon your arrival in Nyaung Shwe, move to Hotel on the lake. Overnight in Aureum Palace Resort and Spa.

Lunch and Dinner by Own Account

Extracted from the Official Itinerary.

 

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.2 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Elephants are large mammals of the family Elephantidae and the order Proboscidea. Two species are traditionally recognised, the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), although some evidence suggests that African bush elephants and African forest elephants are separate species (L. africana and L. cyclotis respectively). Elephants are scattered throughout sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. Elephantidae is the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea; other, now extinct, members of the order include deinotheres, gomphotheres, mammoths, and mastodons. Male African elephants are the largest extant terrestrial animals and can reach a height of 4 m (13 ft) and weigh 7,000 kg (15,000 lb). All elephants have several distinctive features, the most notable of which is a long trunk or proboscis, used for many purposes, particularly breathing, lifting water and grasping objects. Their incisors grow into tusks, which can serve as weapons and as tools for moving objects and digging. Elephants’ large ear flaps help to control their body temperature. Their pillar-like legs can carry their great weight. African elephants have larger ears and concave backs while Asian elephants have smaller ears and convex or level backs.

Elephants are herbivorous and can be found in different habitats including savannahs, forests, deserts and marshes. They prefer to stay near water. They are considered to be keystone species due to their impact on their environments. Other animals tend to keep their distance from elephants, while predators such as lions, tigers, hyenas, and wild dogs usually target only young elephants (or “calves”). Females (“cows”) tend to live in family groups, which can consist of one female with her calves or several related females with offspring. The groups are led by an individual known as the matriarch, often the oldest cow. Elephants have a fission–fusion society in which multiple family groups come together to socialise. Males (“bulls”) leave their family groups when they reach puberty, and may live alone or with other males. Adult bulls mostly interact with family groups when looking for a mate and enter a state of increased testosterone and aggression known as musth, which helps them gain dominance and reproductive success. Calves are the centre of attention in their family groups and rely on their mothers for as long as three years. Elephants can live up to 70 years in the wild. They communicate by touch, sight, smell and sound; elephants use infrasound, and seismic communication over long distances. Elephant intelligence has been compared with that of primates and cetaceans. They appear to have self-awareness and show empathy for dying or dead individuals of their kind.

African elephants are listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), while the Asian elephant is classed as endangered. One of the biggest threats to elephant populations is the ivory trade, as the animals are poached for their ivory tusks. Other threats to wild elephants include habitat destruction and conflicts with local people. Elephants are used as working animals in Asia. In the past they were used in war; today, they are often controversially put on display in zoos, or exploited for entertainment in circuses. Elephants are highly recognisable and have been featured in art, folklore, religion, literature and popular culture.

Inserted from Wikipedia by SP Lim.

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp   Leave a comment


Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

After Breakfast at Amara Montain Resort, Kalaw, Myanmar we were headed towards the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp for the day. We had checked out of the hotel as we were heading towards Inle Lake after the Elephant Camp. We had an Indian food lunch at the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp.

SP Lim

 

(14.11.2016) Day 3:/ Kalaw >> Elephant Camp >> Nyaung Shwe

After Breakfast at your hotel, around 9 am, move to Elephant Camp, see and feel how nature is beautiful and also see how mahout life. Together with mahout, Feeding and bathing elephant, (riding elephant will cost extra charge).

Lunch at Elephant camp After Lunch, move to Inle Lake, Upon your arrival in Nyaung Shwe, move to Hotel on the lake. Overnight in Aureum Palace Resort and Spa.

Lunch and Dinner by Own Account

Extracted from the Official Itinerary.

 

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Day 3.1 ~ Visit to the Green Hill Valley Elephant Camp

Elephants are large mammals of the family Elephantidae and the order Proboscidea. Two species are traditionally recognised, the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), although some evidence suggests that African bush elephants and African forest elephants are separate species (L. africana and L. cyclotis respectively). Elephants are scattered throughout sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. Elephantidae is the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea; other, now extinct, members of the order include deinotheres, gomphotheres, mammoths, and mastodons. Male African elephants are the largest extant terrestrial animals and can reach a height of 4 m (13 ft) and weigh 7,000 kg (15,000 lb). All elephants have several distinctive features, the most notable of which is a long trunk or proboscis, used for many purposes, particularly breathing, lifting water and grasping objects. Their incisors grow into tusks, which can serve as weapons and as tools for moving objects and digging. Elephants’ large ear flaps help to control their body temperature. Their pillar-like legs can carry their great weight. African elephants have larger ears and concave backs while Asian elephants have smaller ears and convex or level backs.

Elephants are herbivorous and can be found in different habitats including savannahs, forests, deserts and marshes. They prefer to stay near water. They are considered to be keystone species due to their impact on their environments. Other animals tend to keep their distance from elephants, while predators such as lions, tigers, hyenas, and wild dogs usually target only young elephants (or “calves”). Females (“cows”) tend to live in family groups, which can consist of one female with her calves or several related females with offspring. The groups are led by an individual known as the matriarch, often the oldest cow. Elephants have a fission–fusion society in which multiple family groups come together to socialise. Males (“bulls”) leave their family groups when they reach puberty, and may live alone or with other males. Adult bulls mostly interact with family groups when looking for a mate and enter a state of increased testosterone and aggression known as musth, which helps them gain dominance and reproductive success. Calves are the centre of attention in their family groups and rely on their mothers for as long as three years. Elephants can live up to 70 years in the wild. They communicate by touch, sight, smell and sound; elephants use infrasound, and seismic communication over long distances. Elephant intelligence has been compared with that of primates and cetaceans. They appear to have self-awareness and show empathy for dying or dead individuals of their kind.

African elephants are listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), while the Asian elephant is classed as endangered. One of the biggest threats to elephant populations is the ivory trade, as the animals are poached for their ivory tusks. Other threats to wild elephants include habitat destruction and conflicts with local people. Elephants are used as working animals in Asia. In the past they were used in war; today, they are often controversially put on display in zoos, or exploited for entertainment in circuses. Elephants are highly recognisable and have been featured in art, folklore, religion, literature and popular culture.

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia.

At the Penang Botanic Garden   Leave a comment


At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

At the Penang Botanic Garden

Flora of Myanmar   Leave a comment


Flora of Myanmar (Burma)

Flora of Myanmar (Burma)

Flora of Myanmar (Burma)

Flora of Myanmar   2 comments


Flora of Myanmar

Flora of Myanmar

Flora of Myanmar

Taiping Lake Gardens   3 comments


Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens is the first public garden established during the British rule in Malaysia. The garden is located near Bukit Larut, and is equidistant to the town centre and the Taiping Zoo.

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

History

The Taiping Lake Gardens was originally a mining ground before it was established as a public garden in 1880. The idea of a public garden was the brainchild of Colonel Robert Sandilands Frowd Walker. The garden was developed by Charles Compton Reade (1880–1933), who was also responsible for planning the Kuala Lumpur garden town, together with Lady Swettenham.

The abandoned tin mine ground was donated by Chung Thye Phin as a recreation park for public use. In 1884 the gardens were planted with grasses, flowers and trees; a part of the gardens was fenced, to keep bulls out.

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

The 64 hectares (160 acres) site was the first public garden in Malaya, and was cherished for its beauty; it has been well-maintained since its opening. There are ten scenic lakes and ponds, which highlight the gardens. Along Residency Road, near the gardens, were golden rain trees (Malay: angsana) (pterocarpus indicus) planted along the pathway. In George L. Peet’s A Journal in the Federal Capital, when he visited Taiping in 1933 he said “I know of no more lovely sight in this country than the Taiping gardens when the rays of the early morning sun are shining obliquely through their clumps of bamboo, palms and isolated trees scattered on islands among the expanse of water. One receives in that glorious half hour an experience of light in foliage that is quite unobtainable in England”.

There are few private and government houses located near the gardens; among them are the Old Residency (home of the Secretary to the Resident), the Raja’s House at the junction of Birch Road and Residency Road and the army officers’ residences on Batu Tugoh Road. The gardens were so striking that they attracted many travelers to write of their beauty:

 

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Taiping Lake Gardens

Attractions

  • Lakes and ponds – There are about 10 man-made lakes and ponds distributed throughout the gardens.
  • Maxwell Hill (Bukit Larut) – A hill station with an altitude of about 1000m; ideal for jungle-trekking and camping. Accessible by four-wheel drive; accommodation available on the hilltop. No reservations; visitors must go early (at 8 am) to buy tickets for the day. Visitors must specify what time they want to go up and what time to come down. Cost is RM4.00 (US$1.40) per person, round trip. One option is to hike up, which takes an average of 2-3/4 hours (one way); the jeep journey takes 25 minutes.
  • Tulip garden – Located at Bukit Larut, it is the first tulip farm established in Malaysia. Admission to the tulip farm is RM1 (US$0.35) outside tulip season and RM2 (US$0.70) during the season.
  • Taiping Zoo and Night Safari Taiping – First zoo to be established in Malaysia; popular on weekends with day-trippers from out of town
    • Day zoo: adults RM12, child (3–12 years) RM8 (US$2.80); discounts available for school groups, senior citizens (age 55+) and tourist groups (20 or more); open 08:30-18:00, feeding times 10 am and noon
    • Night safari: adults RM20, child (3–12 years) RM10 (US$3.50); discounts available for senior citizens (60+) and tourist groups (20+); open 20:00-23:00 (closes at midnight on Saturdays and the eve of public holidays)

Inserted by SP Lim from Wikipedia.

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